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GSX750/GSX750F? is there a difference?

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  • GSX750/GSX750F? is there a difference?

    i tried doing a search, but nothing relevant came up.
    i often hear people mention the GSX750 and GSX750f, are those two separate models? if so, what are the differences between them? i'm confused.

  • #2
    Same bike...the GSXR designate is always used for 'Gixxers', the GSF is the Bandit series.
    My first aid kit comes with lights and siren

    But sir, we are Navy SEALs, we are supposed to be surrounded...

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    • #3
      GSXF is the nomenclature for a Katana.750 or 600GSX is the original designation...the X was the sport version of the original GS bike...this was back in the early 80's

      GSX-R came to be in 1985....the R was for RACE version...aluminum frame.

      Katrider also notes the GSF is the Bandit...and there is the GS500F too...

      F is the designation for Steel frame...F is for Ferrous

      DO NOT LET CYBERPOET TELL YOU OTHERWISE!

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      • #4
        an "F"

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        • #5
          F is the designation for Steel frame...F is for Ferrous
          No, the "F" if for F&%$#'n Heavy !!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by WildKat
            F is the designation for Steel frame...F is for Ferrous
            No, the "F" if for F&%$#'n Heavy !!

            +1

            Tokalosh

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            • #7
              There are actually three primary GSX 750 varients built after 1997:

              The GSX750F, which we know as the Katana 750.
              The GSX750R, which is the race-replica 750.
              And then there is the lesser known GSX750 (no sur-letter), which was offered from 1998 to 2001 in some European markets (but not the North American market) as a naked version -- it's easy to spot, because it uses double side-mounted shocks in the rear instead of a center-mounted shock.

              Here's a picture of the 2000 GSX750:

              http://www.bikez.com/bike/pictureonly?id=372

              Cheers
              =-= The CyberPoet
              Remember The CyberPoet

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              • #8
                you can see all the differences here....they have all specs on all suzukis

                http://www.suzukicycles.org/index.html
                I don't have a short temper. I just have a quick reaction to bullshit.




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                • #9
                  thanks for clarifying that for me. just curious, is the gsxr that much better than the katana, other than being lighter?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by falloutboy33
                    thanks for clarifying that for me. just curious, is the gsxr that much better than the katana, other than being lighter?
                    It depends on how you define "better". Each bike is build for a specific purpose and each bike accels at that specific purpose.

                    A GSXR is a race-replica bike. It's designed to be nimble, powerful, quick at the expense of other characteristics. It puts out a good 30% or more power than a GSX750F (Katana), weighs 100lbs less and turns on a dime. It's not particularly comfortable for long days in the saddle and I can't think of anyone who would want to do 600 to 1000 mile days on them. Everything about the bike is designed around the concept of mass optimization -- from lightweight bar ends to virtually zero storage space, from a single headlight to thin footpegs. Which is great if you ride for an hour and really want to rail...

                    The GSXF is a sports-tourer. It's designed to do commuting duties, long-haul touring, and still have a bit of sporty flair at the end of the day. As a result, it has a simpler engine (no water cooling, still carb'd rather than injected), puts out less power but delivers it smoother across the range, has a higher curb weight (which increases the sprung to unsprung weight ratios for a smoother ride over real roads -- not ideal on a track, but much better on rough pavement), much larger fairing coverage (better weather protection), more comfortable ergonomics. Dual headlights (98+ models), loads of underseat storage space (98+), well padded footrests and heavy bar-end weights to reduce rider fatigue by reducing vibration. Oh, and it's a few grand cheaper to buy...

                    Cheers
                    =-= The CyberPoet
                    Remember The CyberPoet

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