Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X

uneven chain stretch

Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • uneven chain stretch

    my 82 has a dramatically uneven chain. seems too soon for a chain and sprocket replacement. don't mind renewing them, but worried bearings or something else may be amiss to cause the tension difference on half the chain.

    perhaps suzuki ray can give it a thorough inspection if i pay him to change the chain/sprocket.

  • #2
    i'm ordering the parts now, and decided to commit to a 530 conversion. any suggestions of advantageous tooth combination for gearing changes?

    Comment


    • #3
      Fresh out of the crate the Kat was a 630 chain 15/42 set-up as we all know, giving a final ratio of 2.80. Chaining to a 530 or a 520 chain doesn't impact on final drive ratios as it is the sprocket tooth count and diameter of the sprockets that provide the final ratio. Put a 15 tooth 530 sprocket on top of a 15 tooth 630 sprocket and although the tooth count is the same the diameter of the sprockets are very different with the 530 15 tooth being much smaller. However, a 530 15 tooth and 42 tooth set up will still give a final ratio of 2.80. The issue that can arise with a 530 15 tooth sprocket is clearance on the pivot point on the swing arm. Another issue with using a 530 15 tooth sprocket is the smaller diameter places greater stress on the chain links and wears faster compared to a larger diameter front sprocket.

      So as stock a 2.80 final ratio on an 1100 Kat will pull 3750 RPM at 100 KPH in 5th gear. Tyres size also contributes to the equation but that's a headache for another day. As a guide I have an 18/51 combo on my Kat with a final ratio of 2.8333 and I love it, snappy off the line, smooth all through the mid range and no problems in the top end. Revs are up a few (from 3750 to 3950 RPM at 100 KPH in 5th gear) but the improvement in the bottom and middle range. To calculate your final ratio divide the smaller sprocket number into the larger. I hope this helps
      MelWain

      Comment


      • #4
        thank your taking the time to reply. that thorough info helps a lot. especially since you've lived happily with a gear ratio mod on your bike - which is near enough to mine.

        Would this chain sprocket combo kit work?
        http://www.ebay.com/itm/SunStar-530-...hXl5P9&vxp=mtr

        and if swingarm clearance issues are evident, can i place a generic bushing to align the nonstock front sprocket?

        Comment


        • #5
          If you are using a non stock Suzuki front sprocket fit it to the output shaft then you will need a 6mm spacer on the outside of the sprocket. You can then torque the nut to the required setting. Don't forget to replace the tab washer under the nut to prevent it from coming loose. You should be good to go then!!
          MelWain

          Comment


          • #6
            Word of advise, use what ever sprockets you want but, do not go cheap on the chain. We recommend D.I.D, RK or EK O-ring or X-Ring chains. Cheap chains tend to fail early and a broken chain isn't a situation anybody wants.
            "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to upset you when I called you stupid. I thought you already knew..."
            spammer police
            USAF veteran
            If your a veteran, join the KR veterans group

            Comment


            • #7
              Agree. Cheap chains are a no no. If you have an original Suzuki sprocket remove the screws and take it apart. You can then use the outside plate as the spacer as it is about 6mm
              MelWain

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the tips on using a 6mm spacer.

                The chain included in that kit is an X-ring type, but it is sunstar dual guard brand. That is an economy heavy duty model. I'll use it since it matches the sprockets. I may not like my initial choice of new gearing , so I will switch to your recommendation at that time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am testing with a 16-42 toothwheel combo to start with.

                  that is a dramatic change to 2.625 drive ratio.

                  my reasoning for the choice is that i barely use first gear, and don't even need 1st gear to get the bike rolling from stop. if the bike ends up feeling sluggish overall, i'll buy the 45 tooth rear sprocket and swap out.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Let us know how you get on
                    MelWain

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      certainly will post results for reference. i know that combo is a gamble, but it would be nice to end up with a full range of gears. right now i only use the top 4 except to climb steep inclines. i also dislike needlessly wasting fuel when doing top speed for extended periods, for example during roadtrips.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        still breaking in the new chain, but so far the 530 conversion seems to have taken well.

                        with change to 16-42 tooth (2.625 drive ratio), the bike is more forgiving on controls. 65mph(highway speed limit) yields just under 4000rpm. resonant chain rattle also at 4000rpm unfortunately. I suppose that sound will calm a bit when the new parts wear in.

                        the cause of the previous chain wearing too quickly turned out to be the original suzuki sprocket. last owner probably overtightened the screws holding the 3 piece sprocket assembly together. the screws had snapped at some point, and the back oil seal was wobbling free behind the sprocket. there was metal dust everywhere from the chain slowly shaving that hardened steel plate. the front sprocket itself was in surprisingly good shape.
                        Last edited by teigan; 09-13-2017, 12:03 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Are you not using 1st gear to pull off? If not, I would be concerned that you would be using quite a bit of clutch slip to get going in 2nd gear which would place quite a bit of wear on the clutch plates.
                          MelWain

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            yes i used first gear to take off, then immediately needed to gear up.

                            now that i have reduced the low end torque, I can actually make use of first gear without the bike bucking like a mule.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X