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Sparkplug socket size?

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  • Sparkplug socket size?

    I am getting ready to change plugs and do a valve adjustment on my 01 600. I had a 93 and I kind remember it being very difficult to find the right socket to fit down in there.

    Anyone know what size of socket I need and if it needs to be a thin walled socket?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    They say it's 5/8" (~16 mm, the pre's are 18 mm):

    http://www.ngk.com/more_info.asp?AAIA=&pid=2760

    I guess a thin-walled socket would be better...
    - Samuel

    My 1988 Katana 600

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    • #3
      Pre 98's are 18mm, thin walled is good. I have a Popular Mechanics deep socket set I got at walmart that works great.
      ~Jayson

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      • #4
        Simple trick: look in the stock tool kit.

        There's a wrench in there that looks like a piece of tube, hex on one end and a hole in the other. That will take out spark plugs (put a screwdriver through the hole to turn them).

        Otherwise, do it the simple way: buy the new plugs, and on the way home, pop by sears and pick up the right socket for those plugs. as everyone said, thin-walled deep-well or thin-walled spark plug socket are the best.

        Cheers
        =-= The CyberPoet
        Remember The CyberPoet

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        • #5
          You know , I tried that with mine . The tool fit almost all the way down in the well and it was nearly impossible to do ANYTHING with it . Especially if you're going to try to change the plugs while the engine's still hot . OWWW ! Cheap socket works great , though .
          I am a fluffy lil cuddly lovable bunny , dammit !



          Katrider's rally 2011 - md86

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          • #6
            Originally posted by md86
            ...it was nearly impossible to do ANYTHING with it . Especially if you're going to try to change the plugs while the engine's still hot . OWWW !...
            I recall that on some engines its not good to change to plugs when the engine is hot. The threads can more easily get distorted. Maybe that was with the aluminum Corvette engine. But as a general rule, should one wait for things to cool down? Maybe with the Corvette, they actually wanted you to warm up the engine a little. I don't recall. But I know as a rule the manufacturers aren't expecting people to warm their engines up before changing plugs.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by harrye
              I recall that on some engines its not good to change to plugs when the engine is hot. The threads can more easily get distorted. Maybe that was with the aluminum Corvette engine. But as a general rule, should one wait for things to cool down? Maybe with the Corvette, they actually wanted you to warm up the engine a little. I don't recall. But I know as a rule the manufacturers aren't expecting people to warm their engines up before changing plugs.
              Any aluminum engine, change the plugs cold unless you're stuck for time somewhere other than home. Why? Because the hole shrinks some when it's hot because the aluminum expands and pushes inwards, and the steel in the plug expands outwards from the same heat.

              Cheers
              =-= The Cyberpoet
              Remember The CyberPoet

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              • #8
                Originally posted by The CyberPoet
                Any aluminum engine, change the plugs cold unless you're stuck for time somewhere other than home. Why? Because the hole shrinks some when it's hot because the aluminum expands and pushes inwards, and the steel in the plug expands outwards from the same heat.

                Cheers
                =-= The Cyberpoet
                Actually the hole will get larger when the head is heated. That is why to install valve guides the head is heated and the guide is frozen. Although in a factory the guides are super cooled using nitrogen then inserted. it is a once shot deal. The reason why you should not remove spark plugs from the head while the engine is warm is because the elevated temperature reduces the material strength. Therefore increasing the risk of stripping a thread.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tzortn
                  Actually the hole will get larger when the head is heated.
                  Aluminum expands as it heats up -- in all directions it can. For a circular opening, that means expanding into the opening as much as possible (although it's pressing against itself and the expansion should be minimal). The freezing of major parts for assembly works well though, even at home -- like in the case of wheel bearings and steering stem bearings...

                  Cheers
                  =-= The CyberPoet
                  Remember The CyberPoet

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                  • #10
                    Sorry Cyber, but I'm quite sure tzortn is right on this one. This was covered on some of my physics classes in the past. The linear coefficient of expansion directly relates to the amount of expansion of a hole in the same material.

                    If the coefficient of expansion of the two metals is much different or the temperature is high, the binding effect may still be presents, as if one piece (the hole) shrunk and the cylinder (spark plug) expanded. I think we are all still in agreement, that plugs should be changed when cold.
                    Ride like your life depends on it.

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