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Impact wrenches... time to pick

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  • Impact wrenches... time to pick

    I don't have a compressed air source, and due to where I live (in a condo), I'm not likely to have one anytime in the near future. I've been looking at buying an impact wrench -- either a dewalt 18v cordless or a much-cheaper 120v corded model. Anyone know anything about which is better and what I should be looking out for?

    Cheers
    =-= The CyberPoet
    Remember The CyberPoet

  • #2
    I like the Dewalt Cordless 18v's....I've used them at junkyards lots of times...They are strong enough to take lug nuts off and thats usually around 100-120 ft/lbs....I've also used one on one of those cheap scissor jacks that come with your car...stick that on it under the car and it will raise the car up quick...the one i used wasnt mine but I have a nice compressor and almost every air tool you can think of...but I will get one eventually just because sometimes its inconvenient to drag out an airline to switch out a tire.

    Mark

    Comment


    • #3
      Personally I'd rather have a good quality tool any day. Go with the DeWalt & you won't be disappointed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by lopeha555
        Personally I'd rather have a good quality tool any day. Go with the DeWalt & you won't be disappointed.
        Generally that's true, but my 18V dewalt battery charger recently took itself and two batteries to a smokey heaven... thank God I was home, or my home would have been flames and battery acid smoke filled... They were about 7 years old, so I guess they pulled their own weight long enough. The need for new batteries and a charger are part of the thought-process behind considering the battery-powered impact wrench -- since they're dual-use, otherwise I'd stick 100% to an electrically driven version (what a big price-difference). Any more feedback from anyone?

        Cheers
        =-= The CyberPoet
        Remember The CyberPoet

        Comment


        • #5
          i worked at a garage, used car lot, junk yard and on my own bike, if it was me and i cant have air, go with the cord, soooo much easyer turst me and you dont ahve to worry bout the battery after a couple of years just go with the cord and youll be happy i used that same model when i did my sprockes tand it rocks!!! not as good as my my old snap on but pretty close to it

          Comment


          • #6
            I would go cordless for the movability, and the cordless should have more power.
            TDA Racing/Motorsports
            1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
            Who knows what is next?
            Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
            Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by THAZKAT
              I would go cordless for the movability, and the cordless should have more power.
              Was that a typo, or did you really mean that the battery-driven one should have more power?

              Cheers
              =-= The CyberPoet
              Remember The CyberPoet

              Comment


              • #8
                I have the 120v model,

                It's great for small stuff , I use it mostly for tire changing in spring/fall.
                If I remember the specs, it's like 200-225lbs of torque.
                I've done more intensive work with it, and I have to admit, I was really impressed.

                Aramis

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by The CyberPoet
                  Originally posted by THAZKAT
                  I would go cordless for the movability, and the cordless should have more power.
                  Was that a typo, or did you really mean that the battery-driven one should have more power?

                  Cheers
                  =-= The CyberPoet
                  here is the answer
                  http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/to...productID=6347

                  and you said cheap corded
                  http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=92349
                  TDA Racing/Motorsports
                  1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                  Who knows what is next?
                  Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                  Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was thinking:
                    DeWalt 18V cordless impact wrench:
                    http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/to...productID=6347

                    VS

                    The DeWalt Model 290, 120V impact wrench:
                    http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/to...productID=8660


                    VS

                    The much cheaper Chicago Electric 120V impact wrench:
                    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45252

                    (funny how Harbor Freight has the exact same model as a different line item for $30 more expensive:
                    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=31877 )

                    So I guess the real question on the electrics is -- how often do you need 345 lb-ft instead of 240 lb-ft on a torque wrench?

                    Cheers
                    =-= The CyberPoet
                    Remember The CyberPoet

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      yeah
                      Dewalt 18v 300ft lbs. of torque
                      I think is the best deal for reliable, portability and a great backing. I have always loved the DeWalt tools and have many. Chicago tools are good but that is all, they do burn up pretty quick and you are better off breaking the bolts lose with a breaker bar and then using it. That is just my opinion, you can also take it as personal preference.
                      TDA Racing/Motorsports
                      1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                      Who knows what is next?
                      Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                      Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by THAZ
                        Dewalt 18v 300ft lbs. of torque
                        I think is the best deal for reliable, portability and a great backing. I have always loved the DeWalt tools and have many. Chicago tools are good but that is all, they do burn up pretty quick and you are better off breaking the bolts lose with a breaker bar and then using it. That is just my opinion, you can also take it as personal preference.
                        Ok....it all depends on the use it will get. Dewalt comes with a 1 year service contract and a 3 year limited warranty. I just bought a nice variable speed drill to do my polishing with. A Dewalt was $100 for what I needed. Canadian Tire had the same drill (specs) as the Dewalt for $79 reg price, on sale for $39. There brand of tools are Mastercraft. Wrenches, sockets...all that stuff, lifetime warranty like sears craftsman.
                        Their drill, a mastercraft maxum....comes with a 5 yr warranty. I always buy from Canadian Tire...something breaks, you walk in with it and they will give you a new one. The reason I went with theirs and not a Dewalt is cuz if I am polishing, it will be getting some heavy duty use. I will burn it out for sure...no question...eventually it will die....and so will the Dewalt. The diff is I get 5 years with the cheap one only 3 with Dewalt. Plus I can walk right in the store and it's honored there. If you buy from a place like home depot, be prepaired to have them tell you to contact and ship to dewalt....then wait for god knows how long.

                        And to make another suggestion....only go cordless if you have no choice. If you are going to be using that quite a bit, be prepared to swear about a dead battery. if you have to crank 4 sets of lugs off a car, I would be surprised you get them torqued back on with the same battery. maybe....i don't know. i have a whole cabinet of cordless tools that I bough and recieved as gifts through the years. I rarely use them. the batteries never charge like new each time. after enough charging, the life of a full charge gets shorter. So I have to say go with air. I will post a link for a nice compressor for you. I will even go pick it up and ship it to you if you can't find anything like it. If you have closet space that will hold an upright vacume, then you have room for this.

                        http://www.canadiantire.ca/assortmen...romSearch=true
                        I don't have a short temper. I just have a quick reaction to bullshit.




                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Are you looking to use this on just the bike Cyber or everything mechanical?

                          You make some great points Mojoe. That is a great waranty on a inexpensive tool. To bad shipping is so much to get it to AZ.
                          TDA Racing/Motorsports
                          1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                          Who knows what is next?
                          Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                          Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by THAZKAT
                            Are you looking to use this on just the bike Cyber or everything mechanical?

                            You make some great points Mojoe. That is a great waranty on a inexpensive tool. To bad shipping is so much to get it to AZ.
                            Mostly the bike, but it's one of those tools you have when you need it, and there are cars & other mechanical projects around here that get undertaken. Kind of like my hammer-drill. How often do I need a hammer-drill? Maybe once or twice a year (although I need just a plain drill and power driver far more often); still I got the 18V hammer drill about 7 years ago and don't regret it since it does double-duty.

                            I don't know if you guys read the post I put up an hour or two ago about the DeWalt recall on chargers & batteries. Since it would appear they will replace mine for free (SOB's -- I already ordered replacements off eBay), I'm really leaning towards just using a corded version of an impact driver (gee, I wonder how well the hammer-drill would work with the right bit-adaptor to do the same job on the front sprocket or the timing advancer?)...

                            PS - Mojoe, I appreciate the link for the compressor, but space is at a premium here and I can't even that compressor tucked away here in as much as I still have most of a garage-full of tools cluttering/stored in one half of my den.

                            Cheers
                            =-= The CyberPoet
                            Remember The CyberPoet

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The CyberPoet
                              Mostly the bike, but it's one of those tools you have when you need it, and there are cars & other mechanical projects around here that get undertaken. Kind of like my hammer-drill. How often do I need a hammer-drill? Maybe once or twice a year (although I need just a plain drill and power driver far more often); still I got the 18V hammer drill about 7 years ago and don't regret it since it does double-duty.
                              If you are going to take it on trips with the bike, the cordless is the way unless you have a 110 power source on the bike. I have alot of tools such as the hammer drill also.

                              Originally posted by The CyberPoet
                              I don't know if you guys read the post I put up an hour or two ago about the DeWalt recall on chargers & batteries. Since it would appear they will replace mine for free (SOB's -- I already ordered replacements off eBay), I'm really leaning towards just using a corded version of an impact driver (gee, I wonder how well the hammer-drill would work with the right bit-adaptor to do the same job on the front sprocket or the timing advancer?)...
                              I use my cordless 1/2 drive craftsman with a 3/8" socket bit, for small things

                              Originally posted by The CyberPoet
                              PS - Mojoe, I appreciate the link for the compressor, but space is at a premium here and I can't even that compressor tucked away here in as much as I still have most of a garage-full of tools cluttering/stored in one half of my den.
                              If you had a HD you could just turn it into a good lawn ornament and a air compressor Lmao-had to do it, HD engines are great compressors.
                              TDA Racing/Motorsports
                              1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                              Who knows what is next?
                              Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                              Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                              Comment

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