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92 Katana rebuild

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  • 92 Katana rebuild

    Howdy everybody,

    my first post here. The story is...I bought a big Kat about 8 years ago, but the bike had some issues and myself not really the time to ride her, so she went into storage some 5 years ago. Now I decided to see what I can still make out of her and pulled her back to the light. The bike has around 11000 miles and some problems (Gasoline in the oil- need to rebuild carburetors, voltage regulator shot, running only on 2 or 3 cyls until warm, etc.). I am trying to get her running without spending a lot and then I might sell her, since I prefer lighter bikes now. Some pics:




    The head looks good, the cams look like new. Opened a cam journal and it looks fine too. Checked the valves and all clearances were within specs.



    The carbs were already opened by someone before, no surprise. I remember the bike had a strong gas smell after every ride and I found about 6 liters of oil mixed with gas. Luckily, nothing major had happened, so the leakage seems to be an minor and slow one.
    Already checked the vacuum petcock and it let gas run through without vacuum applied. Changed the o-ring inside and it seals now. Also need to check/change all the float needle valves. The bike was idling poorly and all spark plugs black, so the idle mixture may be to be fat.




    Also my first question (I will have more....): I know the voltage regulator is shot. Does anyone know a cheap source? Only the IC, I don't need the entire board.

    Greetings from Costa Rica!

  • #2
    Just buy a good used alternator.... much easier, faster and cheaper in the long run.
    "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to upset you when I called you stupid. I thought you already knew..."
    spammer police
    USAF veteran
    If your a veteran, join the KR veterans group

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    • #3
      Yeah, sounds right, but it's expensive to get heavy items like an alternator shipped to Costa Rica and customs here is always good for a nasty surprise. Small things in an envelope go straight through though.
      I actually tried to get the regulator before I stored the bike away. Had no luck, so I built a replacement for the regulator based on http://jhau.maliwi.de/mot/voltreg.html. I remember it works fine, but I am not confident that it will live long in the harsh environment and prefer the original regulator. If I can't find one, I'll seal my replacement in epoxy and use it.

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      • #4
        Welcome, good luck.
        1998 Katana 750
        1992 Katana 1100
        2006 Ninja 250

        2006 Katana 600 RIP - 130k miles

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        • #5
          Well, in case anyone runs into the same issue, a German parts dealer sells a regulator replacement for a decent price (Nice find on the German GSX1100F board). I have no idea about the quality though.
          https://www.tommotec.de/regler-licht...88-1996/a-792/

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          • #6
            Nice! I didn't know there was a German 1100F forum...thanks for the tip.

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            • #7
              The alternator/regulator may not be the problem. Its usually the wiring (key switch possibly), that sends false voltage reading to the regulator causing the alt. to over charge. I believe its a blue wire or maybe its orange
              My Katana-1100 17" wheel swap
              http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=136894

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              • #8
                Thanks, I tried that by connecting the sensor wire directly to the (full) battery. It should have stopped charging it, but it didn't.

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                • #9
                  In Theory Yes...but a multimeter will let you know 4 sure
                  My Katana-1100 17" wheel swap
                  http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=136894

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I took some time to search for a replacement for the burnt regulator. L9444VB is a compatible regulator IC. It can replace the original regulator chip and sells on Ebay for $11. I ordered one and will put it in as soon as it arrives.
                    Also found a very interesting modification on the German forum which takes care of overcharged and boiling batteries. The guys over there did a lot of research and found that the regulator is actually sensing the battery voltage wrongly and thus can overcharge the battery on long rides. They use a small relay to connect it directly to the battery and got rid of the problem. Good! I will do this as well!

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                    • #11
                      Got that idea from here.....old fix for old wiring...
                      "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to upset you when I called you stupid. I thought you already knew..."
                      spammer police
                      USAF veteran
                      If your a veteran, join the KR veterans group

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yeap, I was going to mention the relay mod. Just curious to what his voltage is, that why I mentioned the multimeter. My bike actually likes 15volts.
                        EDIT..sorry, 13.5 volts ...lol
                        Last edited by katanarider; 08-04-2017, 10:07 AM.
                        My Katana-1100 17" wheel swap
                        http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=136894

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't remember the voltage since it happened years ago. Anyway, I just measured that burnt regulator IC. It shows 0 Ohms between + and field pins, meaning that it will never stop charging. I understand it should stop when the battery voltage reaches around 14.5V.

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                          • #14
                            So, I put the L9444VB voltage regulator in and it works perfectly. Charges the battery to 14.8V. Cheap fix for a broken regulator.

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                            • #15
                              That seems a little high, but it may be ok
                              I'd check for voltage drop before and after the key switch that runs to the alternator just to be certain.
                              Thats usually where the drop takes place. After all, some thing caused the stock regulator to go bad. It may have been over changing before, which caused the factory one to burn out.
                              My Katana-1100 17" wheel swap
                              http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=136894

                              Comment

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