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Used bike saftey checks

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  • Used bike saftey checks

    I purchased an 88 gsx1100f. It seems to be in great mechanical condition. I have replaced the chain, sprockets, wheel bearings, and changed the oil. The tires still have alot of tread on them and the brake pads and calpers seem to be in great working condition. What else should i be checking for?

  • #2
    Tires free of dry rot?

    Check/change the brake fluid?

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    • #3
      +1 on the brake fluid and possibly brake lines (they should be marked with month/year of manufacture) and should be changed every 4 years i believe.

      Also standard stuff like air filter, tire pressure, lubing wires, forkseals.
      There is probably more but I think you have covered the essentials.

      You can also check out CyberPoets tip on buying a used bike
      http://www.motorcycleanchor.com/moto...uyingused.html
      2002 GSXF 750

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      • #4
        I have not checked the breakline but will do so this weekend. The air filter seemed pretty clean so i just blew the minimal dust out with my compressor. Break fluid has not been changed. What fluid would you guys reccommend i use? I will search the forum tonight for the break fluid exchange proccess and get it done over the weekend.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hockeygod1225 View Post
          Break fluid has not been changed. What fluid would you guys reccommend i use? I will search the forum tonight for the break fluid exchange proccess and get it done over the weekend.
          Check your manual, probably DOT4.

          There are a couple ways to change the brake fluid. The important thing is to not let air into the system, from either end (the reservoir or the bleeder). Typically you'll keep the reservoir cap off so you can keep a close eye on the fluid level and top it off so it never sucks air.

          One way is to attach a hose to the bleeder, build vacuum using a little pump, then open the bleeder to let the fluid flow, and close it when the flow stops. Pump the brakes to build pressure back up and repeat.

          If you attach the hose to the bleeder such that it goes up a few inches before going down again, you can do without a vacuum. Open the bleeder, squeeze the brake, close the bleeder, release the brake, repeat. The section of hose that rises vertically from the bleeder will fill with brake fluid, so if the system does suck back in a little, it'll pull in brake fluid not air. It's easier to do with two people.

          One last thing, after you're all done, pump your brakes until they feel solid before you take it out. Otherwise you'll be in for a surprise the first time you brake!

          Regarding tire rot, just because it has tread is no indication that it's not rotted. When I got my bike, the front had great tread and the rear so-so tread, but the front had bad rot all around the rim, so I had to replace it.

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          • #6
            Thanks for that information. I checked the break line dates and it's a good thing i did. If I was correct in Reading them they said 09/87 which leaves me to believe they are the original breaklines.

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