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Emergancy braking 2

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  • Emergancy braking 2

    Babs asked a good question and got lots of good answers, I'd like to share something that I think is also important in terms of braking.

    Babs' post:
    http://www.katriders.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=264

    Last weekend I was scooting down the highway at the posted limit (ahem)
    in the far left lane, the truck in front of me jumped out of the lane to reveal a stalled U-haul truck smack in the center of my lane.
    *gulp* I couldn't dive out of the lane and the "breakdown lane" was full of other cars and people so on with the binders..
    Once I had the brakes set (80% front 20 rear or so) The next thing I did was look in the rear view mirrors!!
    Why?
    I practice "panic" braking pretty regularly. Feeling out the rear as it slides, staying on control with the front braking very hard. etc..
    How many drivers do this?
    You have three pretty large discs and one 5th the weight of even a small
    car. Your safe 80- 0 time/distance is a fraction of the average car.
    Even if you have a Ferrari on your tail I wouldn't bet he has as good a relationship with his braking limits as you..

    So, once you are sure you are not going to crash into the object in front,
    make sure you aren't going to be crushed from behind. When in traffic or just cuising take some time to think "where can I escape to right now if I had to?"

    I remember being in my car, on the highway, when there was a incident that stopped traffic. I stopped pretty fast (four wheel disks on a light sports car) and when I looked in my rear view there was a fella, smoke pouring from his tires and swerving right to left as he tried to stop, I had no escape route as I was by this time stopped, he lost control completely, spun into the next lane and was creamed..
    He got close enough for me to see the terror in his face..
    I'm thankfull I was in a car that day and I have never forgotten that lesson..

  • #2
    braking is important - but just as important is your field of view - if a truck changed lanes and you were suprised by anything you were riding to close. i NEVER follow a large vehicle that i can't see around.

    ride safe

    tim

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    • #3
      Great point B_P.

      I have been hit while in a car that way, unfortunately, more than once. (Bad luck as a passenger)

      I check my mirrors in that same order, out of instinct and a couple clear memories. Ever hear the person next to you say
      "OH SH!T!" while looking in the rearview mirror? You would remember.
      AMA member # 224227

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      • #4
        I had the same thing happen to me TWICE at the SAME intersection. waiting at a stop light, look in the mirror, and see a vehicle bearing down on me. first time was a cavalier second was a jimmy. I bailed, and floored it into the turning lane. Both times the driver couldn't stop in time and creamed the car that was in front of me. Talk about deja-vu, although one was in winter and on in a spring rain.

        A buddy of mine was not so fortunate and got creamed the same way. At the SAME intersection, i kid you not.

        Beekman would know the intersection i'm talking about. hwy 57 and taunton rd. I was on taunton going west. I don't know why people have a tough time there, you have lots of time to brake before the intersection after coming over the crest.

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        • #5
          trinc That is a very good point.
          However my story was not about controling my bike, it was about the uncontrolable factors we might forget about.
          I over dramatized and under discribed the situation.
          I had gobs of room to stop, a hill partialy obscured the view as well. (the cars clogging the "breakdown lane" weren't as "lucky"). The point I was trying to make was that car drivers tend not to be as "on point" as motorcyclists are.(should be anyway).

          So while you have the advantage of low 0-60 and 60-0 times don't forget few others do.
          Your biggest threat may actually be behind you.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by trinc
            i NEVER follow a large vehicle that i can't see around.
            Thats one of my pet peaves, i don't like driving behind anyone if i can't see ahead of them

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            • #7
              Good post BP. I really do need to practice my braking techniques, if it would ever warm up out there ... !

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              • #8
                Originally posted by trinc
                braking is important - but just as important is your field of view - if a truck changed lanes and you were suprised by anything you were riding to close. i NEVER follow a large vehicle that i can't see around.

                ride safe

                tim

                I totally agree about the field of view, but I don't think that being surprised by seeing something unexpected in front of you and be viewed as riding too close. I'm surprised by a lot of what drivers (and riders) do on the road in front of me, but there's a difference between seeing something unexpected and having a good buffer-zone in front, and getting surprised with no room for error or evasion.

                I hate riding behind large trucks, vans, and SUV's. I like to look through the windows of cars ahead of me to see what's up. It's good to always be looking for an out in any situation 'cause if anything can happen, it will. And checking the rear mirrors if you're making a quick stop is a given. You may be giving yourself a good buffer but you can't speak for the jerk behind you.
                sigpic

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                • #9
                  On the flip side of this, when in the cage, remember you can't stop as quick as a smaller lighter vehicle. Give yourself enough room to stop. Please reminds your family to do the same.
                  AMA member # 224227

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Meikol2
                    On the flip side of this, when in the cage, remember you can't stop as quick as a smaller lighter vehicle. Give yourself enough room to stop. Please reminds your family to do the same.
                    +1
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      dont make sure you dont practice this in the line of traffic or on a busy day...i know it sounds stupid to have to say it, but reinforcement is key, especially when you're talking about beginners.


                      but yes, you better be looking around you before you start grabbing and stompin down on your brakes...becuz what good does it do to avoid a head on obstacle when your getting rear ended or sideswiped!

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                      • #12
                        I had a similar incident in my car several years ago. I came over a hill to find traffic stopped. I was able to get stopped, as was the guy behind me. However, the guy behind HIM had a bit of trouble. Luckily, I was paying attention to the rearview mirror. I jumped out onto the shoulder and pulled up past the guy in front of me, giving the guy behind me some room to pull up, which he quickly did. The guy behind him was able to get stopped before plowing into the other car, but he would have hit him if I hadn't given them room. I've always made it a habit to check the rearview as I'm applying the brakes in an emergency situation and I continue to do so on a bike.

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