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  • Chain

    how much slack should the chain have in it i took the back tire off to get a tire put on it i thought before i took the tire the chain had to much slack in it in the first place i was wondering if any one could help with that
    1992 Suzuki Katana 750

  • #2
    half inch up + half inch down (for a total movement distance of 1") halfway between the rear wheel and the front sprocket when the bike is on the centerstand (check the lower half of the chain for this range of motion). Acceptible range is 1.2" - 0.8", and too loose is better than too tight for chain life. I keep mine set between 1 and 1.1".

    You can find the spec, how to check for a stretched chain and everything else you want to every know about chains here:
    CyberPoet's Understanding motorcycle chain wear and maintenance, including adjustment, lube, cleaning, stretch... at MotorcycleAnchor.com.

    Cheers
    =-= The CyberPoet
    Remember The CyberPoet

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    • #3
      thanks for the info my was way off there in the first place and i would get some chain slap when down shifting and engine braking
      1992 Suzuki Katana 750

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      • #4
        Originally posted by The CyberPoet
        half inch up + half inch down (for a total movement distance of 1") halfway between the rear wheel and the front sprocket when the bike is on the centerstand (check the lower half of the chain for this range of motion). Acceptible range is 1.2" - 0.8", and too loose is better than too tight for chain life. I keep mine set between 1 and 1.1".

        You can find the spec, how to check for a stretched chain and everything else you want to every know about chains here:
        CyberPoet's Understanding motorcycle chain wear and maintenance, including adjustment, lube, cleaning, stretch... at MotorcycleAnchor.com.

        Cheers
        =-= The CyberPoet
        Question on this... how much pressure should I apply to try to move the chain to its maximum in both directions? As much as I can muster?

        Comment


        • #5
          when i need to replace the chain should i replace the sprockets as well and if do both what chain type should i get and what sprockets i want to maintance factory number of teeth on both
          1992 Suzuki Katana 750

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TemtnF8
            Question on this... how much pressure should I apply to try to move the chain to its maximum in both directions? As much as I can muster?
            Put a finger against one side. Push firm. That will be sufficient. No need to wrap a hand around it and strain yourself...

            Originally posted by DAWG_4_LIFE
            when i need to replace the chain should i replace the sprockets as well and if do both what chain type should i get and what sprockets i want to maintance factory number of teeth on both
            Yes, unless you can confirm that your sprockets are still in like-new condition (such as if you just replaced them a week prior), you should replace your sprockets as well. Steel sprockets are the ticket if you want to stick to the factory tooth counts. See your owner's manual for chain spec -- get one with the same ratings.

            cheers
            =-= The CyberPoet
            Remember The CyberPoet

            Comment


            • #7
              would this be worth the money for the sprockets and the chain

              http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...spagename=WDVW
              1992 Suzuki Katana 750

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DAWG_4_LIFE
                would this be worth the money for the sprockets and the chain

                http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...spagename=WDVW
                NOT IMHO...
                520 conversions do not last nearly as long (mileage wise) and if you're not changing tooth-counts, then there's no reason not to stick to a 530 set-up specifically intended for your bike.

                Trying to stay cheap? Shop around... JCWhitney has no-name steel Kat sprockets & chain for $70 ($15 + 25 + 40) as individual items. You can have name-brand for $130-$160, which is what you would be paying by the time you add shipping to what was on eBay...

                Cheers
                =-= The CyberPoet
                Remember The CyberPoet

                Comment


                • #9
                  i would like to see someone ( other than me ) give this a try.

                  from other people i've talked to about 520's is they really like it. i would have done it on my last change out but the vortex is the only company i found that sold the kit. Too many people have said vortex sprockets suck. to soft. but the katana probably wouldn't eat it as soon.

                  someone needs to test it.

                  tim

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Remember that you need chain slack while actually SITTING on the bike. 1" of chain slack with the bike sitting on the center stand is not enough. You'll have a tight chain when you sit down. Generally I keep about 1.5" of chain slack without any weight on the seat. Actually, I think it's fine to be able to press 1 link of the chain up against the bottom of the swingarm.

                    Just an observation, but most people I see have chains that are a good bit too tight. Even while going through tech at the track, the most common thing I hear the inspectors tell riders is "Go put some slack in your chain. That's way too tight."
                    -Steve

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stevnmd
                      Remember that you need chain slack while actually SITTING on the bike.
                      I have also read that chain tension/slack should be measured with the bike and rider weight on the rear wheel.
                      Ride like your life depends on it.

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                      • #12
                        Straight out of the owner's manual for the 98+ Kats, which says to check it on the centerstand, rear wheel hanging free:



                        Cheers
                        =-= The CyberPoet
                        Remember The CyberPoet

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The CyberPoet
                          Straight out of the owner's manual....
                          You are right, the owner's manual does say that the measurement should be done using the center stand. The Suzuki Service Manual says "Place the motorcycle on its side-stand for accurate adjustment". It's odd that I keep finding inaccurate (or, at least contradicting) information in the service manual, as compared to the owner's manual
                          Ride like your life depends on it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well, I disagree with Suzuki's recommendation for chain slack then. 1" of slack with no weight on the bike is way too tight.
                            -Steve

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Steve, you then disagree with the owner's manual, and agree with the service manual (the Suzuki one that I have, at least). I'm with you on this one. I think a good measurement of the chain slack is with the rear wheel on the ground, NOT with the rear suspension fully extended.
                              Ride like your life depends on it.

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