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  • #61
    At work if a bolt head is sheared off, toolmakers will sometimes use a rotary tool that vibrates used for etching? Going counter-clockwise causing the bolt to vibrate and turn itself out. I don't own one but it's a hell of alot faster than them using an easy-out or drill and tap or whatnot's.

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    • #62
      New rider

      Just got my first bike 00 kat 750 f
      Stupid question the fuel positions are not marked
      They are forward toward front wheel straight up
      And back toward rear wheel which is which
      Attached Files

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      • #63
        Down is On, Rear is prime, Front is Reserve

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        • #64
          Originally posted by PhoenixZip View Post
          At work if a bolt head is sheared off, toolmakers will sometimes use a rotary tool that vibrates used for etching? Going counter-clockwise causing the bolt to vibrate and turn itself out. I don't own one but it's a hell of alot faster than them using an easy-out or drill and tap or whatnot's.

          Now theres one of my pet hates! Easy outs. When I was doing my time as a tool maker it was pointed out to me that the Easy out was working the wrong way! If you think about it your screwing in a left hand taper thats expanding the broken bolt your trying to remove hence making the sod tighter! THe other problem is if you snap an easy out in the hole its as hard to get out as a broken tap.

          If you want to remove small broken screws grind up a few old twist drills for cutting left handed, or counter clockwise. The flutes wont work but your not trying to clear the swarf your just using the drill to bite into the top of the broken stud/bolt. center pop the stud/bolt and put your drill in reverse and start drilling. 9 times out of then the offending bolt will wind out.

          If the studs broken off above the surface and you have the room to work. Take a length of flat stock mild steel drill a hole the same size as the stud in the flat stock close to one end. bend the stock a bit S shaped so its not laying flat on the surface of the job. Using a MIG welder or TIG drop the flat stock over the stud and weld the stud into the hole you drilled. You now have a wrench that wont slip and the heat from welding should have helped loosen the stud.

          Head stock bearings.
          If you have a taper roller bearing seat that is stuck solid in the head stock of your frame. Run a ring of MIG weld around the taper face of the bearing. The bearing will then fall out.
          Last edited by KevinGambrell; 10-17-2013, 03:03 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
          sigpic
          "Teaching boys to bake cakes? That's no way to maintain an industrial empire."

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          • #65
            Ever have to put a bolt into a hard to reach place.? Can't start it by hand and try to start it with a socket but it keeps falling out of the socket before you can start the threads? I've learned a little trick if you take a napkin/shop towel/ paper towel etc. Rip a tiny piece off and put it around the head of the bolt then put the bolt Inside the socket it will firmly keep it in place to start that bolt. Also if you have a wore out end on a extension and your socket won't stay on. Hopefully this helps someone

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            • #66
              You can use something as simple as a bottle to crank or ride your bike (temporarily) in place of a gas tank just make sure the holes are the exact size as the hose so there's no leaks, be sure to use tie straps or something to fasten it down when moving.
              (i found that used oil bottles work well the plastics easy to drill through but sturdy enough to stay in place)

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              • #67
                great thread!

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                • #68
                  Put PTFE tape on the bleed nipple threads. it prevents bimetallic corrosion and the resulting hassle undoing the nipple, also prevents air sneaking past the threads, making bleeding easier.

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                  • #69
                    This Thread has been of great help! thanks everyone for all the tips
                    '05 GXS600f
                    First time rider
                    DYNATEK Performance Ignition

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                    • #70
                      Learned this thirty years ago from a Sig Erson cam book. You remember books eh? Funny things, printed on . . . . . paper. I think it was called paper.
                      Adjusting valves. After you do it a few times it becomes second nature. Much easier than finding TDC, screwing around with marks, etc.
                      Rotate engine in the normal direction of rotation. With a wrench. Go slow. Wait until the exhaust valve just starts to open. Right there, adjust the intake valve.
                      Continue in the normal direction of rotation. Exhaust opens, exhaust closes. Intake opens, intake closes. Just w-hen the intake closes completely, right there, set the exhaust.
                      If you have buckets, those points are where you take your measurements.
                      If you have an automatic decompression system on the exhaust valve, you gotta work around that.
                      This works on every engine ever made. If you can remember how it works you will amaze your friends.

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                      • #71
                        The easy and sure way of removing bleeder screws that are rusted in.


                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnJ4IQVritU

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by loneraider View Post
                          The easy and sure way of removing bleeder screws that are rusted in.
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnJ4IQVritU
                          Good one. I had to perform that trick literally YESTERDAY. Only difference was that it was an aluminum caliper. The guy in the video had the caliper glowing!
                          I tried propane first, no dice.
                          Got out the acetelyene and heated it until most of it was glowing red. The aluminum acts as a first rate heatsink and it is scary to get too aggressive.
                          Next step (I need to try the wet rag thing, that one is new on me) I drop a 7mm socket (fits over the round part and seats on the hex so you have a good working surface) on the bleeder while it is still glowing red and rap it a couple times with a hammer. Still no dice.
                          Last resort, heat the hell out of it until all of it is glowing red (scary in an aluminum caliper) dropped the same 7mm socket on it and rap it a bit more intently.
                          That did it, it broke free as it should.
                          There are two screws in the 1100f rear, the other one must have witnessed the fate of the first one and gave up easily. No heat required, it unscrewed nicely.
                          Last edited by Jon K.; 11-26-2015, 09:27 AM.

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                          • #73
                            I use a measuring tape to do an alignment. I measure from a givin point like for example , measure from the center of the swing arm pivot to the enter of the rear axle. Make sure both sides are the same measurement and you will be dead on every time without doing 300 half turns lol.

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