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how to-integrated garage door opener

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  • how to-integrated garage door opener

    First off I want to say that this was not my Idea at all I just thought that it was a great Idea. The post was origionaly from kawiforumsand all I did was copy and paste it.

    here is a link to the origional post on kawi forums
    http://kawiforums.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22049

    Items needed:
    12 volt garage door opener
    6 to 9 feet of wire: 16 - 18 gauge (2)
    Wire Taps: 14-18 gauge - Blue (2)
    Electrical Tape
    Pull Ties (6)
    Double Sided Tape (padded type) or velcro

    Tools Needed:
    Crimper or Pliers
    Wire cutter / stripper
    Phillips Screw Driver
    Optional: Soldering Kit
    Optional: Drill for running the wires through the remote door opener case

    Time Required: 30 minutes

    warning: opening your remote may void the manufacture warranty and can cause electrical shock. I am not responsible for any damage you may cause to yourself, motorcycle or remote. This guide is for informational purposes only.


    Fact lesson on how the remote garage door opener works:
    When you press the garage door remote it acts like a switch connecting the remote with the power to send a signal to open the garage door.
    We are going to reverse the process so that the "switch" is always on and the power is used (as a switch) to send the signal to open the garage door.

    FOR EXAMPLE:
    Remote with battery: Power source (battery) is always there, button is pressed to send the signal

    Remote hard-wired to HI-beam: The button is by-passed with a wire that shorts the remote to always on "pressed" and the power (HI-Beam) is used to control when the signal gets sent. This is like taping the button down on the remote, and to operate the door, you would take the battery in and out to send the signal.

    The Remote battery is replaced by hard-wiring (tapping) into the HI-Beam wire which is controlling when the signal is being sent.

    NOTE: For those that like to run the HI-beam 24/7 you can choose to hook it up to the LO-beam wire instead of the HI-beam wire. When the HI-beam is on no juice is sent to the LO-beam, when the LO beam is on no juice is sent to the HI-beam, so either way will work. If you have DUAL HEADLIGHTS you will need to test your LO-Beam to check if it is a FULL-TIME LO. Flick the HI-Beam, if the LO does not switch to HI you cannot run this mod off your LO - it has to be installed on your HI.


    The below picture shows you schematic on how it's connected, followed by details for installation on a Ninja 250. This can be applied to all motorcycles with a 12 volt battery. You just need to find the HI-beam (or LO-beam) and ground wires, the installation is the same.



    How it works when connected to the HI-beam wire:
    You approach the garage door, flick the HI-beam switch the door will open. If the HI-beam is already on you will need to flick it to LO then back to HI the door will open. If you flick it back to LO then to HI while the door is opening the door will stop. If you flick it back to LO then to HI while the door is stopped the door will close.

    WARNING: Before you begin make sure your remote is 12 volts (your battery will tell you) If you have a remote that uses a 9 volt battery you cannot hard-wire the power - it WILL damage your 9 volt remote and make it useless.

    For a 9 volt remote you have 2 options:
    1. Get a 12 volt remote: try Carper Remote Replacements - make sure it is compatible with your door opener.
    2. Regulate the 12 volt output for (s) your 9 volt remote. This how-to does not cover that.


    Step 1: Shorting the remote (by-passing the button so it's always on "pressed")
    There are two ways this can be done WITH SOLDERING or WITHOUT SOLDERING. Soldering is stronger but it can be done without it. If you do not plan to solder please read the whole how-to so you can follow, you will be told your steps through-out the guide.

    Solder Option Only:
    Open the remote
    (warning: opening your remote may void the manufacture warranty and can cause electrical shock. This guide is for informational purposes only.)

    Take out the circuit board and turn it over (leave the battery installed)
    Now refer to the picture ABOVE. You'll see 4 points 2 of which are marked A and B. You will need to locate the 4 PINS (solder points) on your remote. It's pretty easy to find, where the button is you can turn it over and see the 4 points (hold it up to a light).

    Now with a single wire or paperclip touch each end (of the wire or paperclip) to those points. (it's usually a diagonal connection but it may vary on different remotes) when you touch the two correct points the remote light will go on and the door will open, so listen for the door or watch it.

    Once you located the two points, remember them or mark them
    Now TAKE OUT the battery
    Fit (measure) a piece of wire between those points and solder each end of wire to each point: you only need a small piece and do not expose too much wire at the ends: This will "short" the remote which is the same thing as the button being pressed. see picture below





    Step 2: Getting Access to the Headlight Wires
    Both Solder and Non-Solder
    Pull out the headlight connection plug
    You'll find that there's not a lot of wire to play with. So I clipped the PULL TIE that is holding the main harness to the frame (headlight bracket/fairing stay) to get a bit more to play with. (different bikes may vary)

    this picture shows the clipped PULL TIE - It is directly below the SPEEDO



    Step 3: Wire Prep
    Both Solder and Non-Solder
    Remove your seat and detach the red (+) battery connection
    Now you will need to run the wire(s) that will connect the remote to the HI-beam wire through the bike. I chose to install the remote under the seat in the back near the rear tail-light housing. I just followed the main wire harness through the bike and attached pull-ties where access allowed.

    My wire routing is as follows: Headlight Boot through the forks (attached to the main wire harness) under the tank (attached with a pull tie) through the left side of the frame (attached with a pull tie) to the back under the seat. It required that I take off the left side fairing (cover) (Phillips Screw Driver) and the seat. I did not need to take off anything else. But depending on where you choose to install the remote will determine what you need to take off and how much wire you will need.

    About Wire:
    I went to Home Depot and got 9 feet of 16 gauge wire for $3.20, while you are there pick up some wire taps $1.99 14-18 gauge.
    Home Depot only had 16x4 (this means there are 4 [separate] wires (16 gauge) wrapped up in one) I like wrapped wires they are cleaner and easy to work with. I only needed 2 so I pulled out the GREEN and WHITE wires leaving the RED and BLACK (colors may vary) in the wrapping which will be used to run the wires through the bike.
    But any wires will do, I would suggest 16 to 18 gauge.

    Step 4: Connected the remote wires to the HI-Beam wires
    Both Solder and Non-Solder
    Now that you ran your wires through the bike it's time to TAP into HI-Beam wires. Now's a good time to decide if you are going to use the HI or LO Beam wire to power the remote. I chose the HI-Beam (red/black wire) but you can do it with the LO-Beam (red/yellow wire)

    Note: this was done on a NINJA 250 - other bikes will vary in wire color and location - but the concept is the same.

    MAKE SURE THE BATTERY FOR THE MOTORCYCLE IS NOT CONNECTED
    Get the Headlight Connection Boot.
    Peel away some of the tape wrapping the headlight boot wires to expose more wire.
    Take the wire TAP and place the red/black (HI-Beam) wire into and through the tap.
    Place the RED (or whatever color you are using for the Positive connection) into the same TAP just in the other slot.
    CRIMP or with a pliers SQUEEZE the metal TAP part firmly down.
    Close the TAP.

    Do the same to the Ground Line (Black/Yellow)

    TAPS are idiot proof, you have to be a moron to screw it up.
    There are 2 slots in a standard TAP:
    Slot 1 (no protective lip) the POWER wire (the wire you are tapping into for power) runs THROUGH the tap.
    Slot 2 (protective lip) The line you are using to give power to the remote goes into the tap

    You cannot mess it up look at the second picture below, you see the black/yellow (headlight ground) wire going through the TAP and the SOLID black (remote ground) wire connected into the same tap. There is a protective lip that does not allow it to run through.

    pictures of the taps installed





    Step 5: Wrapping the TAPs
    Both Solder and Non-Solder
    Wrap the TAPs and wires with electrical tape - wrap it good.
    Plug in the headlight boot back into the headlight socket.



    Step 6: Optional: Modifying the remote case
    Both Solder and Non-Solder
    You can choose to modify the remote case so that you can run the wires through it and keep the case or you can toss the case and just use the circuit board. I would modify the case, otherwise you'll need to find a way to protect and waterproof the board.

    I drilled a hole in the case to allow the wires to go into the case. Each remote case is different but they can all accommodate this mod.



    Step 7: Connection the remote wires to the remote power terminals
    Both Solder and Non-Solder

    SOLDER:
    Cut your wire to length to where you want the remote installed (I got 9 feet for flexibility)
    If you are keeping the remote case you will need to run the wire through the remote case before you solder. (see picture below)
    Strip the wire tip and solder the positive wire (+) (in my case RED wire) to the positive terminal of the remote.
    Strip the wire tip and solder the negative wire (-) (in my case BLACK wire) to the negative terminal of the remote.

    I ran the wire in the remote and measured how much wire I need exposed for each terminal including the stripped portion of the wire from the wrapping to the terminals so it's an exact fit (see picture below). You don't want too much EXTRA wire in there as the case may not snap close without damaging the solder points.

    NON-SOLDER
    Cut your wire to length to where you want the remote installed (I got 9 feet for flexibility)
    If you are keeping the remote case you will need to run the wire through the remote case before you attach the wire. (see picture below)
    Strip a good length of the positive wire (+) (in my case RED wire) and wrap it around to the positive terminal of the remote and then TAPE it with electrical tape.
    Strip a good length of the negative (-) wire (in my case BLACK wire) and wrap it around to the Negative terminal of the remote and then TAPE it with electrical tape.
    I ran the wire in the remote and measured how much wire I need exposed from the wrapping so it's an exact fit. You don't want too much EXTRA wire in there as the case may not snap close.

    NON-SOLDER ONLY You will need to tape your remote button down so that it's always pressed down. If you are using your case you can do this by tightly taping a marble, pencil eraser or any round object over the button so that it's forced down (on position), you can even use tissue paper. Just make sure the button is pressed down at all times. If you are not using the case find a way to force the button down (tightly taped)





    case closed - wires installed in replace of the battery



    Step 8: Secure the wires
    Both Solder and Non-Solder
    Connect the motorcycle battery, turn on your bike, switch on the HI-Beam. Your Garage door will open.
    Now secure the wires with pull ties
    Use the double-sided tape or velcro to secure the remote in your desired location of the bike.


    wires attached with pull ties



    wires attached to the side of the frame with pull ties



    remote installed in the back under the seat



    How it works when connected to the HI-beam wire:
    You approach the garage door, flick the HI-beam switch the door will open. If the HI-beam is already on you will need to flick it to LO then back to HI the door will open. If you flick it back to LO then to HI while the door is opening the door will stop. If you flick it back to LO then to HI while the door is stopped the door will close.

    Note: If the remote is connected to the HI-Beam and you approach your garage with the HI-Beam already on you will need to flick it LO then Back to HI to open the Garage.

    All Garage Door Remotes only send out one signal when the button is pressed: try it at home.
    Go out of range for your remote hit the button, hold it down (on) and walk in range of your door. It will not open. You will have to release the button and press it again to open the door. This is the same concept. Only you never have to worry about batteries ever again.

    Reasons to do this mod:
    Safer: As in my case I have to turn into my garage so now I don't have to take my hand off the bar.
    No More: DAMN I FORGOT MY REMOTE or searching your pocket, jacket or bag
    Anti-Theft: If you happen to leave your bike outside your house and have a remote somewhere on your bike anyone could gain access to your garage / house or steal your remote. Keep in mind your opener will only work when your bike headlight is on (which means the bike must be started)

    IT's JUST PLAN COOL
    PM me for Ultrasonic Carb Cleaning, pilot screw o-rings and washers and mercury refills

    Harley Davidson
    The most efficient way to turn gasoline into noise without the biproduct of horsepower

  • #2
    I'm looking into doing the same thing. Right now I have the key fob remote for mine. I also have like 3 extra visor remotes laying around and want to put a button on the dash. Reason being the PO had a toggle switch installed on the dash for som reason. If I remove it I have a 1/2 inch hole in the dash. So this would be a perfect addition. just need to find a waterproof switch to put in it's place.
    I could rice it and put a dummy NOS switch, Nahhh scratch that idea.
    92 Katana 600 Project bike
    Some assembly required is my middle name!!!

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    • #3
      could you also use the horn leads to activate the switch? Might annoy the neighbors but would act more like a regular remote than using the high/low beam option.

      Comment


      • #4
        Im sure you could. I plan on doing mine but I will wire up a seperate pushbutton switch but everything else would be the same.
        PM me for Ultrasonic Carb Cleaning, pilot screw o-rings and washers and mercury refills

        Harley Davidson
        The most efficient way to turn gasoline into noise without the biproduct of horsepower

        Comment


        • #5
          I wired mine to a separate black push button that I mounted in the right handlebar pod. I just drilled a hole on the dummy pate and glued it in. It blends right in. But I like the idea of useing the headlight switch better.

          Comment


          • #6
            I just carry mine in my pocket

            Comment


            • #7
              I did one better I bought a keyfob door opener. The range on it is way more than my old one. I still have to take my hand of the bars but it is right on my ignition switch.
              Help Support Katriders.com via Motorcyclegear.com

              "That whenever any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness." - Declaration of Independance

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              • #8
                I have a keyfob remote as well. I leave it in my riding jacket pocket all the time. When I pull up close to the house I poke myself in the side, giggle, and the door opens.
                AMA member # 224227

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like this idea! Very cool.... I was looking at another solution (see link)
                  http://www.jollytec.com/home.htm
                  but I like the idea of having control from the bars (steep driveway etc...).

                  Just a thought - I don't see why it couldn't be activated by just the "pass" switch - I mean I don't use the damn thing for anything else.....
                  Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.
                  -Albert Einstein

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mr. Clean
                    I wired mine to a separate black push button that I mounted in the right handlebar pod. I just drilled a hole on the dummy pate and glued it in. It blends right in. But I like the idea of useing the headlight switch better.
                    I would like to see a picture of that, sounds like a better idea to have a seperate switch.
                    TDA Racing/Motorsports
                    1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                    Who knows what is next?
                    Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                    Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

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                    • #11
                      it could be... you woudl have to wire it into the pass light that is all... all it does is creat and break a circuit.. I knwo someone who did it with their high beam switch
                      Help Support Katriders.com via Motorcyclegear.com

                      "That whenever any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness." - Declaration of Independance

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