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  • Name that problem

    ok so i started pulling the engine apart. and here is what i found. now correct me if i am wrong but isnt that a little too much carbon. the pipe on the bike is an aftermarket vance and hines, knowing the guy i bought it from nothing was done to the carbs. i want to know what i should do since i have the same pipe on the 89 engine i have in the frame now but instead of using the 88 carbs which seemed smaller i used the 89



    *mods please feel free to resize pics if too big.

  • #2
    I am not sure if that is a lot or not considering the year of the engine, and how many miles are on it. Looks like it could defiantely use a cleaning though. Maybe due to the aftermarket exhaust, it needs a jet kit.
    Kan-O-Gixxer!
    -89 Gixxer 1100 Engine
    -Stage 3 Jet Kit / KNN Pod Filters
    -Ohlins Susupension
    -Various Other Mods

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    • #3
      thats what i was thinking. and while i have it apart why not. whats the best way to go about that?

      Comment


      • #4
        It may be carbon, or might be sulfated ash build-up. The real question is how hard it is (carbon build-up is much harder than sulfated ash build-up; if you rub it on steel with lots of pressure, carbon build-up will gouge steel, sulfated ash normally won't). Both can be kept to a minimum by using a good quality oil with a decent detergent load, using higher-quality fuels (not higher octane, just fuels with more detergents in them), and occassionally pushing a good fuel system cleaner through (such as Techron fuel system cleaner, like the last tank before each oil change). It's a whole lot easier than trying to remove it manually...

        You basically have two ways of removing it:
        1. Manual labor (dremel, hand-powered tools) to buff it away, OR
        2. Chemistry (the right chemicals to eat it away but leave the metal undamaged).

        I'd go the chemistry route, even if I was going to port & polish the parts afterwards; much less risk of damaging the parts (esp. if it's carbon and not sulfated ash).

        Good Luck!
        =-= The CyberPoet
        Remember The CyberPoet

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        • #5
          This thread has some tips on cleaning it up:

          http://www.maximum-suzuki.com/ibf/in...howtopic=39589
          - Samuel

          My 1988 Katana 600

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          • #6
            It is pretty good considering that a aftermarket pipe with stock carbs should run lean. Unless the pipe is just a slipon can. To me IMHO it is typical of a Kat, especially if you have to use the choke alot in the climate you are in. I have definitely seen worse before.
            TDA Racing/Motorsports
            1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
            Who knows what is next?
            Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
            Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

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            • #7
              I heard an old bike mech from way back talking about how to clean carbon from a running engine . Basically spraying a solution of either antifreeze/water (50/50) or regular dish soap and water into the intake of one cylinder at a time while it's running , rev it to keep it alive as that one cylinder stops sparking , then move on to the next . He said they used to do it all the time on cars and bikes , and it worked great with no bad side-effects . Discuss . :-m
              I am a fluffy lil cuddly lovable bunny , dammit !



              Katrider's rally 2011 - md86

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              • #8
                When the engine is together you can use transmission fluid in each cyl. at a time or a product called "Sea Foam", it used to be used for 2 stroke engines on boats due to the carbon build up on them.
                TDA Racing/Motorsports
                1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                Who knows what is next?
                Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by THAZKAT
                  When the engine is together you can use transmission fluid in each cyl. at a time or a product called "Sea Foam", it used to be used for 2 stroke engines on boats due to the carbon build up on them.
                  tranny fluid is what i've used.

                  tim

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                  • #10
                    I have used Trans fluid on seized 2 strokes many times, most of the time the just get too hot.
                    TDA Racing/Motorsports
                    1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                    Who knows what is next?
                    Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                    Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hmm i am going to have to give it a try. i took a break from the engine for a bit but when i get beack to it i will have to try.

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                      • #12
                        Hmmm , intersteing . I was thinknig about trying to do something like this to clean out my engine . I'm pretty sure there's gonna be alot of carbon built up in there because of running WAY too rich for too long . So , trans fluid or "Sea Foam" will work in much the same way ? Put some of this junk in the intake or the sparkplug hole and let it run or what ?
                        I am a fluffy lil cuddly lovable bunny , dammit !



                        Katrider's rally 2011 - md86

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                        • #13
                          Fill your tank up with a high quality fuel and pour about 1/4 quart tranny fluid into the tank. At least that is how I do it.

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                          • #14
                            actually carbon build up can have it's pro's and con's, the pro is higher compression the con is miss fire.
                            TDA Racing/Motorsports
                            1982 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 1978 Suzuki GS750 1986 Honda CBR600 Hurricane; 1978 Suzuki GS1100E; 1982 Honda CB750F supersport, 1993 Suzuki Katana GSX750FP. 1981 Suzuki GS1100E (heavily Modified) http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=94258
                            Who knows what is next?
                            Builder of the KOTM Mreedohio september winning chrome project. I consider this one to be one of my bikes also!
                            Please look at this build! http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91192

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by THAZKAT
                              actually carbon build up can have it's pro's and con's, the pro is higher compression the con is miss fire.
                              There are more cons to it that just that:
                              1. Localized heat spots. Carbon takes quite a while to get hot, but once truly hot, it can carry enough heat to do damage to the underlying metals. The hot carbon can also trigger pre-combustion.
                              2. Pure carbon is harder than typical engine metals, meaning if it breaks off a chunk, that chunk can scratch the #$&% out of your piston sleeves, etc., until it gets blown out the exhaust valve. If it lodges under a valve or a big chunk lodges between a valve and the piston head, it can ruin the valve.

                              And that's just the tip of the iceburg...

                              Again, Techron is a simple, fairly cheap, very cost-effective solution that won't foul up your plugs

                              Cheers
                              =-= The CyberPoet
                              Remember The CyberPoet

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