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Monoshock options for 2002 Kat?

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  • Monoshock options for 2002 Kat?

    Hey, having seemly got my Kat back on the road after 3 year hibernation I want to address a few things that will hopefully improve the ride a bit. I've read a few threads here that say you should replace the fork oil every 2 years, I know this hasn't been done for at least 9 years so this will be first thing to sort. The problem I have though is it seems you can't do anything with the mono shock other than replace it, I've found a shock, YSS Z Series that will for but it's 280 quid, are there any other ideally cheaper options!?

    Also if I replace the mono shock would i need to do anything additional to the front, new springs etc or anything like that?

  • #2
    A gsxf750 shock would be a great choice and is fully rebuildable and won't change the ride height.
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    • #3
      I put an R6 shock on my pre and it helped the handling a lot along with proper weight racetech fork springs.
      1989 GSXF 750 Katana.
      V&H supersport exhaust, ported head, GSXR cams
      Michelin PR2's, RT fork springs and R6 shock

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      • #4
        That would work.... drops the rear by 19mm. So, you'll have to drop the front by the same amount.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by 92xjunker View Post
          A gsxf750 shock would be a great choice and is fully rebuildable and won't change the ride height.
          Should have said it's a 600 not 750, would the shock still be fine? Assume your suggesting I get a second have 750 one and give it some care?

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          • #6
            I assumed you had a 600, they are not rebuildable. Yes, the 750 shock is a great choice. Way better shock.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by 92xjunker View Post
              I assumed you had a 600, they are not rebuildable. Yes, the 750 shock is a great choice. Way better shock.
              This was the cleanest one I could find http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/SUZUKI-GSX75...%257Ciid%253A1
              Says the adjuster is stuck so presuming I can just use penetrating spray and patience. What would I need to do to it to overhaul it, are there parts I should replace as a matter of course? Also is there a specific place the reservoir should mount? ...and finally should I replace the hose and banjo bolts?
              Edit: Found more clean examples afterwards but obviously more money. Still 200 cheaper than a new aftermarket one. Can you actually take the whole thing to bits to properly clean?
              Last edited by Seft; 07-16-2017, 04:32 PM.

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              • #8
                Takes special tools to service those and they are pressurized. The tank mount in the tail frame.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Seft View Post
                  are there parts I should replace as a matter of course?
                  Seals would be a top priority and maybe the bladder, Bladder is an inverted bladder so it is not the more common. Sometimes they are collapsed and cracked. The OEM shock really needs some decent valving as rebound is Waaaaaayyyy too slow in OEM form.

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                  • #10
                    TMOD is the suspension expert.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tmod View Post
                      Seals would be a top priority and maybe the bladder, Bladder is an inverted bladder so it is not the more common. Sometimes they are collapsed and cracked. The OEM shock really needs some decent valving as rebound is Waaaaaayyyy too slow in OEM form.
                      Ok, so my options here are to but a new aftermarket shock http://www.wemoto.com/bikes/suzuki/g...ies_monoshock/ for 280 which obviously isn't cheap. (I'd welcome any opinions on the YSS shock?) I can get an old 750 shock in what looks like good condition for about 80 but I'd need special tools to service it, what special tools would they be?

                      When you say needs some decent valving, this means absolutely nothing to me, what would be involved in doing this assuming it's something I could change?

                      When I've looked where I'd normally buy parts from I can't find any parts for the OEM shock, just the whole unit at over a grand so where could I get seals and a bladder from assuming I could also get the tools to replace them.

                      Just trying to work out if new aftermarket would work out cheaper/better than overhauling an old 750 one.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Seft View Post
                        Ok, so my options here are to but a new aftermarket shock http://www.wemoto.com/bikes/suzuki/g...ies_monoshock/ for 280 which obviously isn't cheap. (I'd welcome any opinions on the YSS shock?) I can get an old 750 shock in what looks like good condition for about 80 but I'd need special tools to service it, what special tools would they be?

                        When you say needs some decent valving, this means absolutely nothing to me, what would be involved in doing this assuming it's something I could change?

                        When I've looked where I'd normally buy parts from I can't find any parts for the OEM shock, just the whole unit at over a grand so where could I get seals and a bladder from assuming I could also get the tools to replace them.

                        Just trying to work out if new aftermarket would work out cheaper/better than overhauling an old 750 one.
                        I'm not opposed to do it yourself, but you might want to consider contacting a local suspension shop (who would have all the tools, and know how to revalve for best results) and just get an estimate on a rebuild.

                        If nothing else, it's more info for you to consider and make the best choice from the options.

                        And +1 Tmod is the man when it comes to suspension. If you were in the US, I'd definitely be saying just send it to him.

                        Krey
                        93 750 Kat



                        Modified Swingarm, 5.5 GSXR Rear with 180/55 and 520 Chain, 750 to 600 Tail conversion, more to come. Long Term Project build thread http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=96736

                        "I've done this a thousand times before. What could possibly go wron.... Ooops!"

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Seft View Post
                          I'd need special tools to service it, what special tools would they be?

                          When you say needs some decent valving, this means absolutely nothing to me, what would be involved in doing this assuming it's something I could change?

                          When I've looked where I'd normally buy parts from I can't find any parts for the OEM shock, just the whole unit at over a grand so where could I get seals and a bladder from assuming I could also get the tools to replace them.
                          You would need tools for seal removal and installation, Nitrogen pressurization regulator and bladder needle or schrader valve depending on what way you went. Torque wrench and some red 271 loctite. Also fluid and spray cleaner and a pick set.

                          With all due respect if it means nothing to you when I say decent valving then rebuild/revalve is not for you. Just buy new aftermarket. Valving is the arrangement of shims in various thicknesses in a certain order to arrive at the required damping for the rider/spring combination.

                          Suspension shops around you should stock the parts necessary for that shock as it is a Showa shock.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tmod View Post
                            You would need tools for seal removal and installation, Nitrogen pressurization regulator and bladder needle or schrader valve depending on what way you went. Torque wrench and some red 271 loctite. Also fluid and spray cleaner and a pick set.

                            With all due respect if it means nothing to you when I say decent valving then rebuild/revalve is not for you. Just buy new aftermarket. Valving is the arrangement of shims in various thicknesses in a certain order to arrive at the required damping for the rider/spring combination.

                            Suspension shops around you should stock the parts necessary for that shock as it is a Showa shock.
                            🙂 Point taken, do like to get my hands dirty but sounds like this isn't a job to just 'have a go at' for a pretend wannabe mechanic as myself 🙂 Is the shock sold based on the fit then as opposed to being set for the bike it's sold for and an 'average' rider?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Seft View Post
                              Is the shock sold based on the fit then as opposed to being set for the bike it's sold for and an 'average' rider?
                              Obviously fitment is the priority, But the valving and spring combination on the OEM shock is way off, The rebound is very slow in OEM form and that will lead to packing of the shock if you encounter successive bumps. Not the end of the world but the OEM kat suspension regardless of what year and model all leave a huge opportunity for suspension improvement.

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