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Monoshock options for 2002 Kat?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Tmod View Post
    With all due respect if it means nothing to you when I say decent valving then rebuild/revalve is not for you. Just buy new aftermarket.
    Really not sure where to go with suspension then, it seems that buying an old 750 shock and then getting it properly refurbished and set up by someone who knows what they√”e doing will cost around the same as buying a new aftermarket shock. So if I did get the new aftermarket shock to replace the 15 year old on that√‘ there what√‘ the minimum it would be sensible to do to the front? I know I need to replace the oil as it√‘ been there for far too long but would I need to replace the springs too and if so how do I go about choosing ones that would complement the new rear shock? I don√’ have vast amounts of money to spend so really need to opt for the minimum approach here.

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    • #17
      I would respring for your weight.
      "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to upset you when I called you stupid. I thought you already knew..."
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      • #18
        +1. Your old springs aren't going to be worn out or anything, they just likely weren't proper for your weight. The Kat suspension was set up for something like a 135lb rider. Odds are you weigh more than that so....

        Racetech sells springs that are rated for different rider weights. Take a look at their website. I don't know if they ship to/have distribution to your part of the world, but you can at least find out what spring rate you need. Suspension shops in your neck of the woods should be able to get you springs of that correct rate. Here they sell for ~$120. If you weigh more than 170lbs, or ever do 2 up riding, it is very very worth it.

        Even if you get an aftermarket shock, it will likely have the wrong spring on it for your weight, and the valving would likely be incorrect for your weight/riding style. I'm a cheapass, but holy $+✓é©! Upgrading the suspension is well worth it, night and day difference.
        1998 Katana 750
        1992 Katana 1100
        2006 Ninja 250

        2006 Katana 600 RIP - 130k miles

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        • #19
          Seft,

          Respringing the rear is fine as it has the rebound to control it assuming we are talking the post 750 shock. Respringing the front is fine but will require a bit heavier fluid to slow the rebound down. Since we don't know your weight or at least I didn't see it we are not able to recommend a spring rate for you. All aftermarket shocks are not created equal and if you found a aftermarket shock for near the cost of a revalved OEM then it is probably a pretty cheap quality aftermarket shock and the piston design will be inferior to the OEM piston in the shock. Not to mention on the OEM post 750 you have preload, rebound and compression adjustability. Normally that ranges right about $1000 USD for a decent aftermarket.

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          • #20
            My R6 shock was under $100 and was fully adjustable. Huge upgrade over stock.
            http://katriders.com/vb/showthread.php?t=117405
            Last edited by ZookRick; 07-25-2017, 12:58 PM.
            1989 GSXF 750 Katana.
            V&H supersport exhaust, ported head, GSXR cams
            Michelin PR2's, RT fork springs and R6 shock

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            • #21
              Originally posted by shpielers View Post
              +1. Your old springs aren't going to be worn out or anything, they just likely weren't proper for your weight. The Kat suspension was set up for something like a 135lb rider.
              Thanks, you suspected right, I come in about 79kg(174lbs) would need to weigh leathers etc as well to be accurate though. I've seen a few suggestions of the weight the springs were intended for and all of them different, is there any way to find out for sure, not clear from the manual?
              Last edited by Seft; 07-25-2017, 03:45 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Tmod View Post
                Seft,

                Respringing the rear is fine as it has the rebound to control it assuming we are talking the post 750 shock. Respringing the front is fine but will require a bit heavier fluid to slow the rebound down. Since we don't know your weight or at least I didn't see it we are not able to recommend a spring rate for you. All aftermarket shocks are not created equal and if you found a aftermarket shock for near the cost of a revalved OEM then it is probably a pretty cheap quality aftermarket shock and the piston design will be inferior to the OEM piston in the shock. Not to mention on the OEM post 750 you have preload, rebound and compression adjustability. Normally that ranges right about $1000 USD for a decent aftermarket.
                Was talking about the YSS aftermarket rear shock, think you said it was same as a Showa one but it's not the same as the 750 shock and from what you say likely to be quite poor in comparison. So, if I can't find anywhere local that specialises in suspension and could set up (re-valve) a post 750 shock and I need to go down the aftermarket route what brands should I be looking for and which should I avoid?

                Incidentally I'm about 174 lbs, I've found a couple of sites that had calculators on them but then no one that sold spring it said in the U.K. that matched the result, what's the magic formula I should be using for spring rates for a post 600? Clearly I need to do a lot more reading about suspension too and get a better understanding of what effects what when it comes to riding too!!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by 92xjunker View Post
                  TMOD is the suspension expert.
                  T who? Name sounds familiar..

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Seft View Post
                    Was talking about the YSS aftermarket rear shock, think you said it was same as a Showa one but it's not the same as the 750 shock and from what you say likely to be quite poor in comparison. So, if I can't find anywhere local that specialises in suspension and could set up (re-valve) a post 750 shock and I need to go down the aftermarket route what brands should I be looking for and which should I avoid?

                    Incidentally I'm about 174 lbs, I've found a couple of sites that had calculators on them but then no one that sold spring it said in the U.K. that matched the result, what's the magic formula I should be using for spring rates for a post 600? Clearly I need to do a lot more reading about suspension too and get a better understanding of what effects what when it comes to riding too!!
                    I think I remember seeing the YSS piston design and it was a Showa piston same as the OEM post 750 kat shock. Keep an eye out for things like is the shock an emulsion shock, Any adjusters? What spring rate does it come with and would you have to change it out for something that would be a better fit for you. I am estimating that the spring you would need would be right about a 15.8 kg/mm (900 lb). Not many aftermarket choices for the kat since it is an older model and was not that popular for aftermarket suspension from the start. Nitron makes a nice shock but then the price goes up.

                    A decent suspension shop should not have any issues revalving/rebuilding a OEM post 750 shock.

                    Originally posted by ZukiFred View Post
                    T who? Name sounds familiar..
                    Must be some potato farmer from North Idaho. I think the company re-name is spud suspension or something like that.

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