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  • Corroded Forks

    Has anyone had problems with their forks being corroded like this? Any recommendations on how to tidy this up, purely cosmetic but would be good if I could get them looking good again, don't want to pay someone stupid money to sort them but happy to buy a selection of chemistry and put some work in!
    https://imgur.com/gallery/831Wf

  • #2
    hit it with high pressure water from a pressure washer...other than that, maybe media blasting would work.

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    • #3
      Been there. Red scotchbrite, prime and repaint.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by 92xjunker View Post
        Been there. Red scotchbrite, prime and repaint.
        Prime and paint with what, from what I can see of the good bits it's bare metal, is there something clear I should put on them?

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        • #5
          No, it's painted an aluminum color. Etching primer and brite silver if you want the OEM look.
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          • #6
            Thanks, have some of primer will hunt down some suitable paint. Would I need the epoxy type ideally for that as someone suggested for other metal parts?

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            • #7
              Your choice...
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              • #8
                VHT high temp paint + heat cycle through an oven = really tough and fuel / fork oil / brake fluid resistant coating that is cheap to do.

                Someone likely removed the paint on those forks, probably polished them at one time. If you wanted, you could polish them back up as well. If so, use an aluminum polish with protective coating on a regular basis to keep them nice, or they will start to corrode again. OR you could have a clear coat over the polish. That could be spray or powder coat.

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                • #9
                  You could also polish and the anodize them like they would be done in a shop. Takes a battery charger and some battery acid i believe.... or water.... its been awhile but i know its cheap and dooable at home in a plastic tub..... https://youtu.be/2-lfHN23Iv4
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                  • #10
                    NAPA sells a fuel/oil resistant urethane clear coat in a spray can.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mrontime View Post
                      You could also polish and the anodize them like they would be done in a shop. Takes a battery charger and some battery acid i believe.... or water.... its been awhile but i know its cheap and dooable at home in a plastic tub..... https://youtu.be/2-lfHN23Iv4
                      There's a good kit I can get for doing it I've been looking into, will have a look at that vid link you sent too, thanks.

                      Not many resistant rattle can options so anodising is quite appealing!

                      Originally posted by 92xjunker View Post
                      NAPA sells a fuel/oil resistant urethane clear coat in a spray can.
                      Thanks, will check out if I can get it in the UK, not a familiar brand.
                      Last edited by Seft; 08-05-2017, 04:25 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

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                      • #12
                        Yeah i uses to do this with a black dye when i would customize berettas for carry. Paint just added thickness and rubbed off till it would flake off. So we would dye and anodize them. You can get any color dye for aluminum as well so when you do enough to make it worth its very appealing.
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                        • #13
                          You need anodizing solution, standard dye will fade due to UV. The lower fork tubes are painted from the factory. Anodizing wasn't standard practice back then.
                          Last edited by 92xjunker; 08-06-2017, 11:54 AM.
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                          • #14
                            The dye was a special dye from a company and it wasnt cheap or sold in small amounts. But as far as solution i think i remember just good old battery acid from the auto parts store and water. And for silver there is no need for dye. Any aluminum is better off having an anodized layer as the protective coating vs paint no matter age or grade. While acheiving the same end result, keeping air from reacting with the aluminum, at home painting is unable to be done in a time frame that keeps the aluminum clean enough for paint. Just my opinion. The big difference is that a scratch or chip doesnt cause a bubble, with paint its an inevitability.
                            Last edited by Mrontime; 08-06-2017, 12:10 PM.
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                            • #15
                              Not if done correctly. I paint aluminum almost daily. Spray paint over aluminum will chip and scratch off easily. Quality primer and prep is the key. Aluminum and acid is a major no-no. It will cause the aluminum to become brittle. I use vinegar (5% acid) just to remove oxidation, followed by a baking soda bath, then primer- with minimal time between the steps. Then you can follow standard paint prep. I found the a golf cart charger (48v) works very well for anodizing but, it takes a lot of prep to anodize aluminum without being splotchy in color.
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