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Ok...you need to take this advice, or not!

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  • #31
    Originally posted by slowgsxf600 View Post
    It depends on WHERE you paint it. If I am in a clean booth I shouldn't have to sand anything. But if I'm in a barn, most likely I'll have to sand some bigger dirt chunks/hair/bugs out and dust back over it. 800 to 1000 grit should be fine for this unless you are using waterbourne paint. Adhesion shouldn't be a problem if flash times are correct per paint manufacter. After everythings cured just sand the nibs out out of the clear if you want to keep the peel, or sand everything for a smooth finish.
    of course there are exceptions. like if I am painting in a hurricane, I will probably have to pull a dent or two out in the middle of my paintjob cuz a can of cambell's tomato soup came whizzing by and bounced of my tank.

    so let's just assume my advice is for those with a relatively clean working environment.
    I don't have a short temper. I just have a quick reaction to bullshit.




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    • #32
      I agree with what your saying. You are not supposed to sand basecoat if you don't have to. Although, most people on here are not painting in a clean booth. You would be surprised how easy particles cling to automotive paint. Not to mention basecoat fisheyes that have to be sanded. The booth (or spray room) we have at the shop I work at can fit up to five cars in it and is hard to keep clean so I know about having to sand things out of basecoat. I believe Harleys are painted by people and they have to follow strict guidelines and personal preparations before stepping into their booths. I don't know much about other manufacter procedures though.

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      • #33
        actually, your are right. I was just being a bit sarcastic cuz it is a wet and cold day.

        with that said, yes, if you have crap in your base, you don't have much choice but to sand, fisheyes included. However, I would not wetsand for this. wetsanding puts you into much more work because all that scum has to be cleaned off afterwards. so if you do have to remove contaminates, my suggestion would be with a scotch-brite pad. I actually do that with all my parts before painting, but it is more like a "dusting" than sanding. so I would try that first, and only wetsand if completely necessary, otherwise you get right back to the same problem this thread was meant to avoid...and that is loosing the depth of your paintjob.
        Last edited by Mojoe; 04-13-2011, 06:54 PM.
        I don't have a short temper. I just have a quick reaction to bullshit.




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        • #34
          Oh my god

          I wish I had known this before...I painted a Ford Ranger in rattle can blue. I wanted it to be better then the average rattle can job so I would spray on a coat across a section, then wet sand it by hand, then move on to another section and repeat. I went around the whole truck about 5 times painting and wet sanding and washing off the gunk. Took FOREVER! Granted it was the smoothest feeling rattle job I'd ever felt. Almost as if it had clear on it already. However I knew I wouldn't be clearing it because I felt the matte blue look is perfect for a old 88 Ranger

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Lorelei View Post
            Oh my god

            I wish I had known this before...I painted a Ford Ranger in rattle can blue. I wanted it to be better then the average rattle can job so I would spray on a coat across a section, then wet sand it by hand, then move on to another section and repeat. I went around the whole truck about 5 times painting and wet sanding and washing off the gunk. Took FOREVER! Granted it was the smoothest feeling rattle job I'd ever felt. Almost as if it had clear on it already. However I knew I wouldn't be clearing it because I felt the matte blue look is perfect for a old 88 Ranger
            how long ago did you do this? I only ask because base coat is a lot like primer in the sense that unless it is covered with clear, it usually doesn't last all the long. it can chip easily and flake off, or worse yet, just soak up the moisture and start rusting any metal underneath. primer and base coat are both kind of porous.
            I don't have a short temper. I just have a quick reaction to bullshit.




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            • #36
              Mike, I have been reading "at" and "around" this thread, and I want to thank you heartily for the information you have imparted. Your input on my last painting venture was as important to the job I did as the paint was. Thanks, compadre.


              "A knight proves his worthiness by his deeds."

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              • #37
                Great thread and you couldn't be more right. I run into clients all the time who want me to repair a paint job they done. Not usually a big deal as its normally wetsanding and buffing/polishing their orange peel out, but I've ran across paint jobs that were sanded in between base and clear. Some as rough as 400. All I can do at that point is to tell them "sorry theres not much I can do about that. Its under the clear". They always get mad about it lol.
                If it aint broke fix it till it is

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by zuma View Post
                  Mike, I have been reading "at" and "around" this thread, and I want to thank you heartily for the information you have imparted. Your input on my last painting venture was as important to the job I did as the paint was. Thanks, compadre.
                  My pleasure, Dan. I am not a "professional" by any standard, but I was a pro at screwing things up in the beginning, so all I am doing is trying to save some folks some time, and money.

                  Originally posted by Mrclean81 View Post
                  Great thread and you couldn't be more right. I run into clients all the time who want me to repair a paint job they done. Not usually a big deal as its normally wetsanding and buffing/polishing their orange peel out, but I've ran across paint jobs that were sanded in between base and clear. Some as rough as 400. All I can do at that point is to tell them "sorry theres not much I can do about that. Its under the clear". They always get mad about it lol.
                  yup...once the cleared is laid on, there isn't much you can do about it.

                  for the record, though, I use nothing but 400 under my base. I have had a ton of people tell me that 400 is too rough, but I never had a paint job where there were sanding marks. but no way in hell I would go over the baser coat with 400. doing that is just begging for a messy paint job.
                  Last edited by Mojoe; 09-23-2011, 11:06 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
                  I don't have a short temper. I just have a quick reaction to bullshit.




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