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Best for highway/long distance?

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  • Tecumseh
    started a topic Best for highway/long distance?

    Best for highway/long distance?

    Hello,

    I am new to this whole game and tires are a big, big world of information to digest and sift through.

    I am about to embark on a long, long journey on my 2002 Katana and was wondering if some experienced riders wouldn't mind tossing some tips my way via rubber.

    I am going to cruise down the west coast from Canada to Mexico on the 101 and then head back up through the mountains, over to Colorado to visit my brother and then not sure where to go after that. But I'll be putting 5000+km on this set and most of it will be highway. I do like the twisties (who doesn't?) but that won't be most of what I am doing.

    Michelin Pilot 2CT seem to be out of the question based on reviews, they are awesome tires but not so much for extended highway.

    Dunlop Roadsmart II seems legit, any reason not to go with these?

    Bridgestone Battlax BT-45 also seems good and bit cheaper than the Dunlops.

    I am assuming it's safe to stay away from the "value" brands, like Shinko? Or are they actually ok? (https://www.canadasmotorcycle.ca/shi...rear-tire.html)

    Thanks for any and all help!

  • dano68
    replied
    To each their own I guess. When I bought my Kat, the P.O. had new Kendas on. I hated those tires. Local bike shop talked me into the Shinkos, although better than the Kendas, still did not like them at all. Bought a set of Pirelli angel sport touring and absolutely loved them. I am currently running on PR 4's(figured I would give em a try). A great tire but I still prefer the Pirelli's, great in dry conditions and just as great in wet conditions.

    Leave a comment:


  • TripleKing
    replied
    Running Shinko 712s. They do fine. They grip well and wear well. Shinko bought tooling from Yokohama. Shinkos are not cheap Chinese knockoffs many message boards make them out to be. They are actually pretty darn good tires, for everyday use.

    Leave a comment:


  • Any Cal.
    replied
    Finally got to ride a bit on the BT45s I ordered last year.

    I put them on myself, using a 2x6 and minivan to break the bead on the old tires, and a recipro saw to cut them off. They were very old and very hard. Took about 2 hrs start to finish to pull wheels off, change tires, and put them back on. Since install cost was 0, total tire cost was around 200 after rebate and shipping.

    Got them on the day before it started snowing, and didn't get to ride them 'til this spring. Did roll them once during the winter to help prevent flat spots. They rode rough for about 5 miles on the first ride in spring, and have been great since.

    My bike was a basket case, so I haven't pushed it real hard, but tires seem fine so far. It does seem like they are difficult to break in on the sides, when I lay it down in tight corners it seems to creep out a bit right as I lean over the farthest. Of course, I am riding on uneven, heaved pavement with bits of gravel on it, so may not even be the tires fault. Not a heavy lean either, maybe 20*

    They are definitely stickier than the hard old tires that came off. So far pleased with the purchase. Haven't ridden them in the rain, but they have done well on crummy roads and frost heaves/cracks, and aren't too terrible on dirt and gravel. They are significantly heavier than the radials, btw. Probably wouldn't put them on something real sporty, but seem about right for my old Kat.

    Leave a comment:


  • 92xjunker
    replied
    You get what you pay for.

    Leave a comment:


  • shpielers
    replied
    Originally posted by Any Cal. View Post
    And lets be realistic, 1/2 the guys here (including myself) are running hacked up fighters or naked bikes, and trying to decide whether to run dual sport tires.
    He knows us so well

    Leave a comment:


  • Any Cal.
    replied
    No, just saying that performance is a matter of perspective. I am putting tires on a 25 year old bike made with old technology for all around riding. Without a track to push it on, I don't think a performance difference will necessarily show itself. Also, there is a finite,(at least in my case), amount of money that will be spent on the bike. I expect the cost difference between bias and radials to buy other parts that will make a bigger difference in performance.

    And lets be realistic, 1/2 the guys here (including myself) are running hacked up fighters or naked bikes, and trying to decide whether to run dual sport tires. A sport touring is going to be the worst choice they can make?

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  • 92xjunker
    replied
    Nope, bias ply tires are not performance based tires. Radials hold there shape better than bias ply. Bias ply tires tend to hold a flat spot where the tire sat with a load on it, till warmed up. Giving you a thumpy feel as it rolls. More so when it's cold.

    Leave a comment:


  • Any Cal.
    replied
    Some bikes still come w/ bias-ply from the factory. I figure that they are supposed to be better for heavier loads, and are a tougher tire. The tradeoff is potentially a stiffer ride and potentially less performance. The other factor is that they are significantly less expensive.

    In my case, it was premium quality OE size bias ply tires vs. off brand, off sized radials. Seemed a no brainer. An additional 30%-40% would get premium quality radials.

    I guessed I would get more performance out of BT45s and an R6 shock (incoming ) than spending the same money on radials. Guess I'll know in a few thousand miles!

    Leave a comment:


  • ygolohcysp
    replied
    I've just put BT-45's on my crf150f race bike myself. They are bias-ply tires. That caused me to do a little research on the tires. There is nothing inherently dangerous about bias ply tires .vs radials. The biggest difference is that radials have a different number of plys for the tread area .vs sidewalls because of how they are constructed. That makes them lighter, and the sidewalls are thinner. Because of the profile of todays style of tires with low sidewall profiles, it doesn't really negatively effect the road feel.

    Bias ply tires are better for heavier load applications, such as full touring bikes loaded down with luggage and or an extra person. For touring, specifically with bad pavement quality on roads, then having the extra strength of bias ply may very well be better than radial tires.

    I can only guess that for a 200 pound supermoto bike, they do so well because the compound doesn't need to get as hot as real race/slicks do (the bike is so light, real race tires never get quite hot enough). Further, with the stiffer sidewalls that are thicker, I can run really low air pressure (16psi) for more grip surface, still have good feeling from the sidewalls, and the extra thickness also helps retain any heat I manage to get into the tires.

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  • ZukiFred
    replied
    Originally posted by Any Cal. View Post
    No idea if the BT45s are good, but I just bought a set from Bike Bandit. Came to about $235, and Bridgestone has a $50 rebate going. Ended up with stock sizes, was the only tires I could find in those sizes. Want to see what the designers intended... will see if I like it!

    *Edit* They are biasply, so heavier than radials, FWIW. Supposed to be set up for touring, and dual compound in rear for increased life. I wasn't really looking for a full sport tire, was looking more for an all-around to include touring and poor roads.
    I would not recomend biasply tires to anyone myself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Any Cal.
    replied
    No idea if the BT45s are good, but I just bought a set from Bike Bandit. Came to about $235, and Bridgestone has a $50 rebate going. Ended up with stock sizes, was the only tires I could find in those sizes. Want to see what the designers intended... will see if I like it!

    *Edit* They are biasply, so heavier than radials, FWIW. Supposed to be set up for touring, and dual compound in rear for increased life. I wasn't really looking for a full sport tire, was looking more for an all-around to include touring and poor roads.
    Last edited by Any Cal.; 09-20-2016, 04:53 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • GoFastAngelYYZ
    replied
    Personally I think you did great with the choice of Mich PR's .. I'm running the 4 for my rear (160/60r17) and have been thru the ringer as far as weather goes and never felt a moment where my confidence wasn't high ..
    BT45 front for now, okay tire but corners could be leaned over more on a Mich ..

    Leave a comment:


  • Kat Floyd
    replied
    I have almost 1000 miles on my conti motion rear and it looks brand new!

    Leave a comment:


  • Stinger02
    replied
    My katana has seen a lot of highway miles as my daily commuter. I have a 500 mile a week commute and my tire of choice is the Continental motion tires. I won't run anything else on my bike. I get a little over 10k miles out of them. The price is just right on these tires!

    Leave a comment:

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