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Best for highway/long distance?

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  • #16
    Some bikes still come w/ bias-ply from the factory. I figure that they are supposed to be better for heavier loads, and are a tougher tire. The tradeoff is potentially a stiffer ride and potentially less performance. The other factor is that they are significantly less expensive.

    In my case, it was premium quality OE size bias ply tires vs. off brand, off sized radials. Seemed a no brainer. An additional 30%-40% would get premium quality radials.

    I guessed I would get more performance out of BT45s and an R6 shock (incoming ) than spending the same money on radials. Guess I'll know in a few thousand miles!

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    • #17
      Nope, bias ply tires are not performance based tires. Radials hold there shape better than bias ply. Bias ply tires tend to hold a flat spot where the tire sat with a load on it, till warmed up. Giving you a thumpy feel as it rolls. More so when it's cold.
      "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to upset you when I called you stupid. I thought you already knew..."
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      • #18
        No, just saying that performance is a matter of perspective. I am putting tires on a 25 year old bike made with old technology for all around riding. Without a track to push it on, I don't think a performance difference will necessarily show itself. Also, there is a finite,(at least in my case), amount of money that will be spent on the bike. I expect the cost difference between bias and radials to buy other parts that will make a bigger difference in performance.

        And lets be realistic, 1/2 the guys here (including myself) are running hacked up fighters or naked bikes, and trying to decide whether to run dual sport tires. A sport touring is going to be the worst choice they can make?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Any Cal. View Post
          And lets be realistic, 1/2 the guys here (including myself) are running hacked up fighters or naked bikes, and trying to decide whether to run dual sport tires.
          He knows us so well
          1998 Katana 750
          1992 Katana 1100
          2006 Ninja 250

          2006 Katana 600 RIP - 130k miles

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          • #20
            You get what you pay for.
            "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to upset you when I called you stupid. I thought you already knew..."
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            • #21
              Finally got to ride a bit on the BT45s I ordered last year.

              I put them on myself, using a 2x6 and minivan to break the bead on the old tires, and a recipro saw to cut them off. They were very old and very hard. Took about 2 hrs start to finish to pull wheels off, change tires, and put them back on. Since install cost was 0, total tire cost was around 200 after rebate and shipping.

              Got them on the day before it started snowing, and didn't get to ride them 'til this spring. Did roll them once during the winter to help prevent flat spots. They rode rough for about 5 miles on the first ride in spring, and have been great since.

              My bike was a basket case, so I haven't pushed it real hard, but tires seem fine so far. It does seem like they are difficult to break in on the sides, when I lay it down in tight corners it seems to creep out a bit right as I lean over the farthest. Of course, I am riding on uneven, heaved pavement with bits of gravel on it, so may not even be the tires fault. Not a heavy lean either, maybe 20*

              They are definitely stickier than the hard old tires that came off. So far pleased with the purchase. Haven't ridden them in the rain, but they have done well on crummy roads and frost heaves/cracks, and aren't too terrible on dirt and gravel. They are significantly heavier than the radials, btw. Probably wouldn't put them on something real sporty, but seem about right for my old Kat.

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              • #22
                Running Shinko 712s. They do fine. They grip well and wear well. Shinko bought tooling from Yokohama. Shinkos are not cheap Chinese knockoffs many message boards make them out to be. They are actually pretty darn good tires, for everyday use.

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                • #23
                  To each their own I guess. When I bought my Kat, the P.O. had new Kendas on. I hated those tires. Local bike shop talked me into the Shinkos, although better than the Kendas, still did not like them at all. Bought a set of Pirelli angel sport touring and absolutely loved them. I am currently running on PR 4's(figured I would give em a try). A great tire but I still prefer the Pirelli's, great in dry conditions and just as great in wet conditions.
                  2002 750 Kat
                  2013 Polaris 850 XP LE(wrecked)
                  2002 Ski-Doo MXZ 800
                  2002 Ski-Doo MXZ 800 X-package
                  1999 Ski-Doo MXZ 670 H.O.
                  2009 Kawasaki KX250F(SOLD)

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