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  • Need new tire

    So today I seen my back tire has a nail in it. Its not leaking air, but it doesnt seem safe to ride on so I'm getting a new back tire. (I need a conti road attack). So the question is, other than Iron Pony, where could I pick up a new tire in the columbus area that will mount and balance it also? Iron Pony will cost about 160ish I believe, so Im looking for something cheaper. So any suggestions let me know. Thanks

    Or if there is another tire I could get that is less money, but still a good tire, let me know. Shinkos was suggested by someone else.
    Last edited by j_wal; 05-20-2009, 01:48 PM.
    'Not accidents! Crashes. Almost every crash can be prevented by avoiding distractions while driving.'

  • #2
    The same thing just happend to me but my tire wouldn't hold air. I went to Iron Pony and bought a rear Conti road attack 150/70/17 (stock) they had it in stock and had it changed before I was even done looking around in the store. It was about 169.75 with dismount/mount & balance and I took my old tire (hung it on the wall of my garage, to have some art hanging around). Right off the back the tire felt better than the stock Dunlop (which only was half way through it's life span) and it wasn't even broke in yet. The bike feels grippier. I can flick it back & fourth quicker & easier, not to mention the tread pattern looks cool. Also for that tire that was close to if not the cheapest deal. Don't have any feed back on other tires or prices.

    Comment


    • #3
      (A) Get to the auto parts store, get a tire plug kit (about $8). Remove the nail and use the kit to plug the tire. Riding on a nail/screw/etc. is a recipe for disaster, because sooner or later, it's going to get way too hot, and it may also fly out of the tire at any point. Keep the kit under your seat for future issues.

      (B) Best tire for the Kat, IMHO, is the Metzeler Z6 in the stock sizes (120/70ZR17 front, 150ZR17 rear); the Pirelli Diablo Stradas are a very close second (almost identical to the Z6's, and made in the same factory). These are a wise choice because they handle excellently on the Kat both when new and when old, and typically last over 12k miles for riders (rear; the fronts last even longer usually).

      Cheers
      =-= The CyberPoet
      Remember The CyberPoet

      Comment


      • #4
        I was pretty much just going to get a new rear road attack and keep the front tire. If i got the Z6 or strada would there be any issues with that? Ive been told the front helps "cut" the water for the rear, but if i dont ride when its wet, i dont see a problem with them not being the same?

        Oh, and thanks for the input
        'Not accidents! Crashes. Almost every crash can be prevented by avoiding distractions while driving.'

        Comment


        • #5
          If you were happy with the road attacks, then use 'em.

          If you don't ride in the rain, it probably won't make a whole lot of difference, but IMHO, I'd have both replaced and sell both the freshly-plugged rear [with full disclosure] and the still-good-front on eBay (you'll get about 80-90% of the mail-order cost of a front from the front; probably about 50% of the mail-order cost of a rear from a plugged rear, meaning you'll be ahead on the total transaction). But I'm really picky about tires that way.

          Cheers
          =-= The CyberPoet
          Remember The CyberPoet

          Comment


          • #6
            I may try to sell a plugged rear, but Ive only put about 4 or 5 hundred miles on them so Ill prolly keep the front. Plus Im broke and dont have enough to buy both.

            But if i can plug the tire would I even need to get a new tire? Would it be safe to ride on? I dont do track or anything but I like to go fast and lean in corners.
            'Not accidents! Crashes. Almost every crash can be prevented by avoiding distractions while driving.'

            Comment


            • #7
              Different people have different opinions. Personally, I've ridden on plugs for 1500 miles while waiting for a replacement tire to arrive (or getting home from a trip), but I won't ride on a plug once I can get a new tire... Even if the failure rate is only 1 out of 100, are you willing to take that risk for $50 - $80 (the difference between what you'll get for the old one and what the new one will cost ya)?

              Cheers
              =-= The CyberPoet
              Remember The CyberPoet

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah, I think Ill just get a new tire
                'Not accidents! Crashes. Almost every crash can be prevented by avoiding distractions while driving.'

                Comment


                • #9
                  grab a STOP & GO pocket tire plugger

                  Using the mushroom type tire plugs there is never any need to buy a new tire.
                  they won't leak and cant come out like the string type
                  98 GSX750F
                  95 Honda VT600 vlx
                  08 Tsu SX200

                  HardlyDangerous Motosports

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hardlydangerous View Post
                    grab a STOP & GO pocket tire plugger

                    Using the mushroom type tire plugs there is never any need to buy a new tire.
                    they won't leak and cant come out like the string type
                    While they won't leak (and traditional plug kits won't typically either), there is an inherent safety danger for high-speed radials in terms of damage to the metal belting and subsequent heat transference & stress issues -- and potential internal delamination as a result (esp. as the weight of the bike goes up). This issue is big enough of an issue that it's actually illegal in the UK to plug/repair Z-rated motorcycle radials by any shop or mechanic.
                    The tire manufacturers echo this same advice on their technical FAQ's, although Dunlop specifically says [or used to say] that some of their tires (D205 comes to mind) are repairable (once), upon which the speed limit for the tire drops to 70 mph.

                    Cheers
                    =-= The CyberPoet
                    Remember The CyberPoet

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just put on a set of Bridgestone Battleaxe BT021's on My 750, ordered them on ebay and had a local shop install for $15 a piece. Love the tires so far.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        True if you plan on running the bike above 120mph for extended amounts of time, running a plugged tire is not the best.

                        for the most part my bike runs under 75mph 95% of the time and I'm sure most smart riders are about the same...

                        As for the tire MFG's they will tell you anything to get you to buy a new tire.
                        The rasp for the Stop & Go is about 1/2 the size of the standard string type rasps and the plug is 2X the size of the hole, unlike the string type plugs... (never did like them anyway but work ok in atv tires)

                        I completely understand the safety of our fellow riders is the most important and thats why I only recommend the shroom type plugs.... but in my many years as a mechanic and shop owner, crew cheif, talking to dozens of bikers everyday I have never ever talked to someone that has had a proper plug or propperly plugged tire fail.

                        as for heat transference & stress issues running a tire at or below the indicators or even down to the cords like so many tires I have seen on here ijn the past few years will cause more issues then an 1/8" hole ever would.

                        I have seen and patched many tires and the biggest issue I have seen in some cases the plugs don't wear as fast as the tire and need to be trimmed
                        98 GSX750F
                        95 Honda VT600 vlx
                        08 Tsu SX200

                        HardlyDangerous Motosports

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          hm, things to think about. if i were going to plug it, how would i do that? just deflate the tire, or do i have to take it off the rim? and the most i ever ride is 90, which isnt often, other than that its whatever the speed limit is
                          'Not accidents! Crashes. Almost every crash can be prevented by avoiding distractions while driving.'

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by j_wal View Post
                            hm, things to think about. if i were going to plug it, how would i do that? just deflate the tire, or do i have to take it off the rim? and the most i ever ride is 90, which isnt often, other than that its whatever the speed limit is
                            The joy of a plug is that it goes in from the outside (where patches normally go on from the inside, and only work with tires that are flat on the interior side).

                            For a plug:
                            Traditionally, you use a reamer tool that comes with the kit to "prep" the hole (it clears away any contamination and makes fresh rubber rubber face the plug), then you use the insertion tool to install the plug itself (the insertion tool can either look like a screwdriver with a slot in the end to drag a string-type plug through, or like a rivet gun to push a mushroom type plug through). For the string-type plug kits, I greatly prefer tools with T-handles over ones with regular screwdriver-style handles -- much easier to work into the tire because of leverage and grip.

                            Some kits provide separate glue for the plug; most string-style (standard automotive style) plug kits come with the plug strips already coated with the appropriate rubber-melding adhesive. Here's a good how-to on the standard string-type kits:
                            http://www.alpharubicon.com/bovstuff/tirepluguzi.htm

                            Note that many mushroom-type plug kits run about the difference you'd expect to pay between a new tire and the used, plugged tire on eBay -- because of the tools involved. Since both types of kits are good for multiple repairs, it can be a wise investment, but if you're tight on $$, get a good tire instead.

                            KNOW THIS:
                            Many BMW dealers will have Kat-sized rear tires with 50% life still on them in their dumpsters or out back because many BMW riders are very aggressive about changing rubber. I've known many a starving college student who kept their bikes shod with these used cast-offs for free via a late-night visit...

                            Cheers
                            =-= The CyberPoet
                            Remember The CyberPoet

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hah, i might have to find a BMW dealer. But thanks for all the info
                              'Not accidents! Crashes. Almost every crash can be prevented by avoiding distractions while driving.'

                              Comment

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