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i have a 1989 750 it time for new tires ????????????

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  • i have a 1989 750 it time for new tires ????????????

    i want a wider back tire the current sizes is a 150/70/17r and 110/80/17f
    but i want someting wider on the rear what size should i get and will i have to change the front tire too if so what size should i use???
    "LOOK EARL ITS KARMA'S ARMY MADE UP OF THE PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD"

  • #2
    you will need to change the rear rim...and I assume the front as well

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    • #3
      no dont want to change the rims but does any one have a set of rims off a 98+ for sell
      "LOOK EARL ITS KARMA'S ARMY MADE UP OF THE PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD"

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      • #4
        I would start by looking in EBAY.

        Help Support Katriders.com via Motorcyclegear.com

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        • #5
          Big just go to a 110/70 front and a 150/60 rear. You can get Metzler M'1 sporttechs. I currently run a 120/60 and a 160/60 on my 89 Kat with the stock rims. They did just fine at the GAP last year. go to www.ronayers.com and look up the tires. I can get the M1's shipped to my door for $203 Do not listen to RANGE he is DEAD to everyone.
          www.mopowersports.com

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          • #6
            now does the 60 mean its a wider tire cross ways or higher up and down im looking for crossways
            "LOOK EARL ITS KARMA'S ARMY MADE UP OF THE PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD"

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            • #7
              160 is wider than 150 crossways (that's what wider MEANS ) . Now if he said something like a 150/80 , THAT would be a thicker tire (though I don't rember ever seeing such a size) . If you can find a stock tire size in a brand you want , you really would be better off just getting that . It's just kinda hard finding anything really in a 150/70 .
              I am a fluffy lil cuddly lovable bunny , dammit !



              Katrider's rally 2011 - md86

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              • #8
                Re: i have a 1989 750 it time for new tires ????????????

                Originally posted by bigtwan251975
                i want a wider back tire the current sizes is a 150/70/17r and 110/80/17f but i want someting wider on the rear what size should i get and will i have to change the front tire too if so what size should i use???
                While you may be able to physically fit a larger set of tires on the bike, but that doesn't mean you can do so safely with the wheels you currently have. A 150/70 and 120/70 are about the largest combination you can safely use with the stock pre-98 rims, unless you find a manufacturer who builds specialty wide tires designed for narrow rim-widths (Avon is one brand known to do so, but I don't know what they have for the 3.5" rim).

                There are three obvious answers, depending on how bad you want it:
                1. Swap wheels with a 98+ Kat or SV650.
                2. Get a different bike with wider wheels.
                3. Drop the notion that you want wider wheels.

                See these threads for more info:
                http://www.katriders.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=2684
                http://www.katriders.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=711
                http://www.katriders.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=378


                From my upcoming book (only partial -- tires are covered in far more detail in the book):

                How to read tire fitment charts and info:

                Typical complete tire description: 120/70ZR17J (58W)
                *
                Now, let's break that down into pieces that make sense:

                The first number (120) represents the widest point of the tire's width between the left and right sides, called the "section width", and measured in millimeters. In this example, the width of the tire is 120 millimeters.
                *
                The slash ( / ) is there to differenciate the first number from the second number, and serves no other purpose.
                *
                The second number (70) represents the sidewall height as a percentage of the first number (in this example, it tell us the tire sidewall height is 70 percent of 120 millimeters, or 84 millimeters tall).

                Then comes either one or two letters (in our example, ZR). Sometimes these letters are placed elsewhere in the description, but traditionally, they should be listed this point. The first letter is always the speed rating (see Speed Rating chart), and the second letter, if it is there, is an "R" (radial tire) or a "B" (bias tire).

                The next numbers (17) represent the wheel's diameter, measured in inches. In this example, the wheel is 17 inches across.

                A letter at the end of the first part of the designation (the J in our example) is not required, but if present means that the tire has a special characteristics to match some manufacturer's specific motorcycle model. For example, Metzeler makes (made at the time I wrote this) a Z4 radial as a 150/70ZR17, as a 150/70ZR17B, and as a 150/70ZR17J, where the "B" model was intended specifically the OEM factory tire for BMW 1150GS models (reinforced sidewall & lip design), and the "J" model was intended for Yamaha FJR1300's (a minor tread pattern variation from what I could tell).

                A two digit number follows, which is sometimes omitted but never should be (58). This number represents the load capacity or weight rating of the tire (in terms of how much weight, including both the rider and the motorcycle itself, the tire is designed to handle as it's maximum). In our example, the 58 can be looked up in a cross-referenced chart, and represents a maximum load rating of 520 lbs. There is no simple way to directly convert the number to the weight that I have been able to figure out.

                Finally, a letter may follow the load capacity (W). This is a manufacturer "modifying descriptor" and means that the standard for the tire is modified by some means (W generally means higher speed rated than a standard Z rated tire). We haven't been able to find a cross-reference for the various modifiers (yet -- they do vary by manufacturer), so if you are concerned about the rating modifier, contact the actual manufacturer's rep for the tire.

                Additionally, all motorcycle tires are normally marked with three or four digit code on their sidewalls, which represent the date of manufacture (the first two digits are the week of the year, the last digit is the year of the decade it was manufacturered in). Since modern cycle tires are only good for about five years from the date of their manufacture (the time period it takes the various compounds that keep the tire pliable and strong to evaporate out), knowing which year of a decade it was manufacturered is normally enough. Example: 011 would be a tire manufactured in January (1st week) of 2001. 118 would be a tire manufacturerd in the 11th week (between the 13th and 19th of March) of 1998 (since 2005 hasn't arrived yet, as I write this). As a general rule, newer tires are better, and we recommend you buy tires manufactured within the past 12 months whenever possible (obviously, if you have a flat away from home, you will take whatever you can get). Do not buy a four or five year old tire!

                Good Luck!
                =-= The CyberPoet
                Remember The CyberPoet

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                • #9
                  thanks cyber for the info knew u could helpppppppp
                  "LOOK EARL ITS KARMA'S ARMY MADE UP OF THE PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD"

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