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Mechanics 101 Can't get it to run right? Find a trick to add HP?
From the first oil change to completely rebuilding the engine,
this is the place to talk about the heart of the beast!


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Old 04-24-2017, 06:58 PM   #11
RobertTravis
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One bit that wasn't too clear was talking about drilling out a brass plug to get the carb bodies open, need to understand this part as it wasn't too clear from the pictures, drill, hmmm...
If I remember correctly, my kit had 2 drill bits.

Drill 1 was for drilling the sheet metal idle circuit screw covers just enough to thread in a sheet metal screw for prying them out.

Drill 2 was for drilling out the slides so that they'd go up faster for better throttle response.
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Old 04-25-2017, 03:04 AM   #12
Seft
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Default Ultrasonic Cleaning for Carbs

So there seems to be a mass of opinion on was is/isn't the 'right' or 'best' way to clean carbs even on this site let alone the rest of the internet. Given that small ultrasonic cleaners are quite cheap now it looks like a viable option vs the various cans of sprays and other chemistry and results I've seen pictures of look excellent if they're actually genuine.

Does anyone have any experience of this, searching this forum threw up a couple of suggestions from people to try it but no one posting evidence it was good?

This was the cleaner I was looking at and it state carb cleaning as one of its uses, need to check the dimensions of the tank vs the largest piece of carb: https://www.amazon.co.uk/GT-Professi...NS/ref=sr_1_25

Last edited by Seft; 04-25-2017 at 03:26 AM..
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Old 04-25-2017, 03:35 AM   #13
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As you've notice, there seem to be more than one way to get the job done. So, I think you've already answered your own question. Just try something and if it works, great. If not, well, try something different. Theres no doubt that spray can carb cleaner will always be on of the most valuable tools. The reason why, if you spray the carb cleaner through the little holes (circuits) its got to go some where. Either its going to push the debris out or its going to splash back in your face. Be sure to where safety glasses. Being in the UK, I'm not 100% sure whats available to you. It may benefit you to talk to someone local.
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Old 04-25-2017, 07:04 AM   #14
RobertTravis
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So there seems to be a mass of opinion on was is/isn't the 'right' or 'best' way to clean carbs...
Sometimes the spray & pray method works...many times not. Ultrasonic is good, but I wouldn't rely on it as my only means of cleaning a carb thoroughly. Neither method will free chunks/debris from small circuits every time. You still may need to run some fishing line through to get out the crusties...

My own preference is to first clean the outside using a solvent like carb cleaner...then run wire/line through the circuits and wire brush by hand critical areas, then soak in Berryman, then brush/chase again, then spray clean with solvent, used compressed air and inspect. Repeat as necessary.

Whatever it takes to do it right...A schematic of the carb circuits is helpful. This way you aren't lost in 'world of wonder' because you don't really KNOW what has to be cleaned and where. When you know how the carb works, you can focus your efforts where it matters and technique doesn't mean a whole lot. Doing a 'right proper job' does.
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Old 04-25-2017, 07:31 AM   #15
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Sometimes the spray & pray method works...many times not. Ultrasonic is good, but I wouldn't rely on it as my only means of cleaning a carb thoroughly. Neither method will free chunks/debris from small circuits every time. You still may need to run some fishing line through to get out the crusties...
Thanks, I was coming to the conclusion that it'd be a case of testing out a few different methods. The cleaner machine has an internal capacity of Tank 150x140x100mm (LxWxH) which should easily hold dismantled bits of the carbs, will measure them on the bike later to check.

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My own preference is to first clean the outside using a solvent like carb cleaner...then run wire/line through the circuits and wire brush by hand critical areas, then soak in Berryman, then brush/chase again, then spray clean with solvent, used compressed air and inspect. Repeat as necessary.
Interesting you mention a wire brush, I've read a few things saying to avoid this as you can scratch the surfaces and screw them up, is this not the case from your experience?

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Whatever it takes to do it right...A schematic of the carb circuits is helpful. This way you aren't lost in 'world of wonder' because you don't really KNOW what has to be cleaned and where. When you know how the carb works, you can focus your efforts where it matters and technique doesn't mean a whole lot. Doing a 'right proper job' does.
I'm learning as I go with this and have watched through quite a few videos on how they work so it'll be interesting when I have them off the bike to actually see what's what etc.
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:17 AM   #16
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Once you start cleaning them, you'll tell yourself what needs to be done. If you come to a point where you feel uncomfortable, just return here to Katriders and we'll help walk you through from that point forward. But to address what you just asked...A regular tooth brush and a simple degreaser of any type should clean the outside/exterior bodies. If your left with a small stain, you'll think to yourself, what will clean that particular area. For example, if its rust, then try a rust solvent. I've seen a video on youtube were a guy used lemon juice with hot water to remove rust from carbs. As for the brush, a simple tooth brush will clean the aluminum body after a good soak. But if you need something with more scrubbing action, attempt a alternative chemical first and then a different brush. Brass brushes are softer than steel.
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:32 AM   #17
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...A regular tooth brush... Brass brushes are softer than steel.
Word & word....but any brush that fits where you need it to that is supple/soft enough to clean without scraping is fine. The key is to not mangle the brush by pushing too hard etc.

In my experience cleaning things, sometimes the chemicals or even pressure just isn't enough. Some things need gentle abrasion in order to get clean. Case in point, the carwash. Some of those touchless automatic pressure washer ones just don't get the car clean the same as if you washed it with a soft cloth.
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Old 04-25-2017, 02:16 PM   #18
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If you come to a point where you feel uncomfortable, just return here to Katriders and we'll help walk you through from that point forward.
Cheers, I'm counting on it

I'll document my cleaning experiments too and post them up, might be useful to others who are coming at this from the same naive position I am!
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