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Specter
04-28-2007, 11:18 AM
I picked up my Kat today from the shop and rode it about 15 miles back to my house. I was quite nervous, but I made sure to bring my jacket, helmet, and gloves. My brother (who dropped me off there) followed behind me. I decided to take the highway part of the way back and felt a little more comfortable because of less shifting/braking. I think I rode pretty well, but there is one recurring problem that I'm having with riding:

Whats the proper way to start from a stop? I think I stalled 4 or 5 times trying to get it moving, 2 of them were in traffic. How much throttle should I give it before releasing the clutch? I think I was having a hard time controling the throttle because a few times i revved it up to 5K or so and it would jerk. My brother riding behind me says I did braking/turning/cornering/signaling pretty well, so I'm pretty confident about those areas. I'm not going to ride 15 miles again any time soon, but I was interested in hearing some of your thoughts.

Black_peter
04-28-2007, 11:36 AM
You need to:
Take a course. (it's best over all and will give you professional advice as well as a bike to thrash instead of your own!)

Find a parking lot (where the businesses are closed, like a mall before opening etc) And practice everything...

Now about the clutch. With the bike running on a flat surface:
Keep off the brakes and gas! Just sit on the bike..
Pull in the clutch and put it in first.

Now slowly let out the clutch... Slow like a snail.
As the plates come together you will feel the engine start to pull the bike.. as the bike really feels like it's going to move pull it back in. Do this a few times.
This will give you the feel for where in the lever motion the clutch starts to grab.

Now, do it some more. Only now as the bike starts to grab keep (really slowly!!) letting out the clutch and (really slowly!!) add gas.

At idle, the bike can get moving (super slow) with the clutch out. But you want to be able to move off a stop briskly. This is the key to clutch work. Adding clutch, and adding fuel evenly so you are only adding the amount of fuel needed to match the clutch being fed.

I'm going to assume that you do not drive a standard transmission car?? After a while you get "muscle memory" The right foot (gas) works with the left foot (clutch) to get the car going. Cool thing is that the left/ right arrangement is kept on bikes. So a large part of the muscle memory carries over.

Good luck, and be careful!

Specter
04-28-2007, 12:20 PM
I'm signed up for the MSF course, but it'll be about a month since they're all full until then.

I actually drive a manual car as my daily driver and I know what you mean about muscle memory. the thing about it with a bike is, it's harder to "hold" the RPM's with a given amount of throttle. For me, it just seems like when you hold the throttle at some point, the RPM's keep going up. Its easier on a car because you can hold the RPM's at a certain point and as you get moving they slowly drop as you let out the clutch.

But you're right, I need to find a parking lot to practice in. Thanks for the advice!

woobie
04-28-2007, 12:44 PM
Practice finding the friction point of the clutch, this is part of the MSF up here.


Find an empty parking lot

From a stop, in first gear. Slowly let out the clutch without applying throttle, when you see/feel the engine rev's drop slightly pull the clutch back in, that's the clutch catching. That's your fiction point. From there you want to practice your take offs. Don't dump the clutch, but smoothly release it.

When I picked up my bike I was revving up to 3 or 4K taking off from a stop.

Then practice your take offs, in 1st, left foot on ground, right on footpeg ,release brakes and slowly(but not too slow) let out clutch and apply throttle. Once your moving come to a stop a few feet latter and repeat.

Once you've master that then you'll need to experiment on a slope :shock: . Clutch throttle and rear brake.

Black_peter
04-28-2007, 12:53 PM
I'm signed up for the MSF course, but it'll be about a month since they're all full until then.
Good for you~
Very sharp Kat by the way.. And I hate 98+

I actually drive a manual car as my daily driver and I know what you mean about muscle memory. the thing about it with a bike is, it's harder to "hold" the RPM's with a given amount of throttle.
Ok then play with just the throttle, maybe your cables need adjusting or lubing??


But you're right, I need to find a parking lot to practice in. Thanks for the advice!

Anytime.. And thanks to woobie for translating it into Canadian..
:lol:

Nero
04-28-2007, 05:46 PM
+1 for all the advice already given. If a more experienced rider can ride your bike with no problems, chances are, it's your riding technique (specifically, throttle control) vice any problem with the bike.

Taking off from a start is really a negotiation between the clutch and the throttle. It's common for beginners to rev too high because they're afraid the bike will die if they don't, and that can lead to a disaster where you can accidently dump the clutch and twelve the bike (pop a crazy wheelie) or lose control. You can practice some basic manuevers and hone your throttle control skills in a parking lot (with the business owners' permission) until you take that course. Look forward to that course. It will be a great intro and a great confidence builder for you too!

Good luck and drive safely! :-D

madkatana
04-28-2007, 09:25 PM
I agree with woobie. Find a large parking lot, like a school parking lot, then lay out some plastic water bottles, empty of course with no lids, then just pretend... Practice your stops, left turns, right turns etc... Eventually you'll get a feels for the clutch and the stalls will go away. Then setup and practice your long turns and sharp right turns. It will take about 6 months to a year to feel comfortable on the bike but it will be worth it. Then find yourself a roadracer friend and listen to everything he can teach you about pitching thr katana into a turn. And take their criticism, it may save your life one day as most of us ride at half the speed they do... Last, take the MSF course and get your endorsement cops don't like it when you don't have the right paper work, lol

timpryor
04-29-2007, 12:32 AM
Just Rev it to about 8 grand and dump the clutch, well on second thought thats not such a great idea

+1 on what these guys said just find an empty parking lot and find the friction point, its just like learning to drive a manual car.........just easier

87vert
04-29-2007, 06:57 PM
Very sharp Kat by the way.. And I hate 98+


aww come on now you say that about every 98+, quit trying to hide it that you are a 98+ lover.

Black_peter
04-29-2007, 07:55 PM
Very sharp Kat by the way.. And I hate 98+


aww come on now you say that about every 98+, quit trying to hide it that you are a 98+ lover.

It's true I love all 98+ Kats...






Except yours!!!
:lol:

87vert
04-29-2007, 08:48 PM
It's true I love all 98+ Kats...

Except yours!!!
:lol:


Md86 and I were working on a shirt design..

87vert!! Looks sweet! (and I hate 98+)

Pulled from:

http://katriders.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=30008&highlight=

why the sudden change of heart

:cry:

md86
04-29-2007, 10:34 PM
Yeah , and what happened with the shirt thing :-s ? I STILL want one REAL bad , just gotta figger out the last part of the tagline :thinking ......