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View Full Version : What do these hoses connect to?


5150Kat
02-09-2007, 02:51 PM
Well I got every thing apart and replaced my spark plugs. Well I went to put it all back together and now I have 2 extra hoses. I have the fuel, vacuum, and breather hoses already connected. The two hoses I have left are between carbs 1 and 2, then another one between 3 and 4. I never disconnected these so I do not know how they came lose or what they came off of.
Thanks

Drastion
02-09-2007, 02:55 PM
These are more than likely the two hoses that go over the top of you airbox and just drape down right at the bottom of the back side(back side meaning the side closest to the rear tire) of your air box.

You might see, if it's still there, two tube holders on the top of the airbox that look like spark-plug wire holders. After they are placed in that holder they split above the opening of the intake side of the airbox and are slipped through a small cylinder located one on each side of the air box beside the intake opening to hold them in place.

kat
02-09-2007, 03:16 PM
yeah they connect to nothing they just sit loookin pretty overflow or breathers...... i forget its so long since i played with my carbs

5150Kat
02-09-2007, 03:59 PM
Ok Thanks guys that makes sense. But that seems dangerous open hoses from the carbs hanging down by the battery? I mean gas is not gonna come out of these right?
So what are they for if they do not connect to anything?

The CyberPoet
02-09-2007, 05:21 PM
Because of the way the tubes route (up, against gravity), their length and are only fed from the fuel bowls (which don't contain all that much gas), it's a non-issue that they dump out close to the battery. Healthy battery connections don't spark anyway, and the only time the fuel is at hazard is if the bike is grinding metal against the ground in a wreck (in which case having the tubes for the fuel storage space is good).

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

5150Kat
02-10-2007, 03:21 PM
Ok thanks cyberpoet! I think I will still try to pin them up so they are not directlu over the battery. Anyway cyber I have another question for you. When I replaced the spark plugs the old ones were really black. What exactly does that mean. do I need to have my carbs cleaned and sunced?

Anonymous
02-10-2007, 03:33 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/Nuclear_fireball.jpg/250px-Nuclear_fireball.jpg

5150Kat
02-10-2007, 04:34 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/Nuclear_fireball.jpg/250px-Nuclear_fireball.jpg
thant's what I am afraid of :(

Anonymous
02-10-2007, 04:36 PM
Don't worry about it. This is what I do in fuel threads.

The CyberPoet
02-10-2007, 05:18 PM
When I replaced the spark plugs the old ones were really black. What exactly does that mean. do I need to have my carbs cleaned and sunced?

Compare them to this chart:
NGK Spark Plug Condition Chart (http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinfo/spark_plugs/faq/faqread2.asp?nav=31200&country=US)

Black plugs could be multiple things (and you didn't mention whether it was a dry black or wet black):
Lots of carbon build-up can usually be attributed to running too rich, which could be caused by the choke plunger stuck on, running too much choke (or too long on choke), bad jetting, taking too short a rides (never gets hot enough to burn off the build-up), or a clogged air filter, among other things.

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

KatanaSoldier
02-10-2007, 05:59 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/Nuclear_fireball.jpg/250px-Nuclear_fireball.jpg :lol: :lol:

5150Kat
02-10-2007, 10:00 PM
My plugs are deffinately dry fouling(2nd pic in the chart). I use as little choke as possible. In most cases no more than one minute and I don't let the rpms go above 2000, the only time I leave the choke on longer is when it has been sitting for a few days(rarely).

I want to take it to the shop in a few weeks to have the valves adsusted and carbs cleaned/synced, while I'm at it I'll show them the old plugs and see what they find.

The CyberPoet
02-11-2007, 01:31 PM
5150, how hard is your choke cable to use (i.e. - is it like bending a paperclip easy, or is it like trying to bend a thin nail)?

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

5150Kat
02-11-2007, 03:57 PM
Cyber, it is like bending a paper clip pretty easy.

The CyberPoet
02-11-2007, 06:25 PM
Starting habits:
Maximum choke use should be 30 seconds and just enough choke to keep the bike at 2k; after that, you should use the throttle by hand to keep the RPM's up until the bike won't stall. In exceptionally cold weather, this may not be viable, and you may have to use the choke for a longer period of time (a thinner oil will help in such situations).

You may also want to take a toothbrush and some carb cleaner or WD-40 to the choke plugers at the carbs. Remove the tank, turn the choke control all the way on (watch for the metal plungers they pull out of the sides of the carbs) and clean those plungers clean. Debris on them can keep them from seating all the way again, and a single one stuck in the out position can keep the rest from seating properly as well because of the common activation bar (the one the choke cable moves).

For more on fouling, see:
NGK FAQ: What causes spark plug fouling? (http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinfo/spark_plugs/faq/faqfouled.asp?nav=31200&country=US)

In Katana's, it my experience that most fouled plugs come from riders who start their bikes and then just ride a mile or two, park, repeat (or who just start it up and let it idle for a while, then shut it off). In situations like this, the plugs never hit burn-off temp, and thus never clear.

Irridium spark plugs may help minorly; they reach burn-off temp a bit faster and have a slightly wider range of burn off temps (about 50 degrees extra on each end of the temp range). I do carry them for all the Kats.

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

Anonymous
02-11-2007, 06:28 PM
Agreed. Isn't it at least 10 minutes of riding before the plugs even reach applicable burnout temperature? Or is it less?

The CyberPoet
02-11-2007, 06:51 PM
Agreed. Isn't it at least 10 minutes of riding before the plugs even reach applicable burnout temperature? Or is it less?

Something like that. Depends on the engine and the mods, but it can easily be 5 minutes if it's 85 outside and 15-20 minutes if it's around 40 (F) outside.
Common mods:
Ignition advancer: gets to temp faster, runs hotter.
Jet kit: runs richer, but cooler as a result. Takes longer to get to temp.
Irridium plugs: gets to temp slightly faster, burns off across a wider range.

Old/partially evaporated fuels will also generally burn cooler because the lighter compounds are gone, meaning it takes longer to hit full operating temp and fouling is far more likely to occur.

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet