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nightmare
01-26-2007, 06:24 PM
Yesterday while I was riding I came out of a turn, up-shifted, and gave it some throttle (I was only around 4k coming out of the turn...about 25 mph). As I gave it throttle it felt like it fell into a lower gear or something because suddenly the rpm's just shot up to around 6k (much higher and quicker than I had opened the throttle). I've read that jumping out of gear is a sign of potential transmission problems, but the bike is practically brand new (a little over 2000 miles) and I've babied the engine so far: no wheelies, burnouts, barely take the engine past 8k rpm and NEVER take it above 5k in the first two gears, had the 600 mile service, followed break-in instructions precisely, etc.

So my question is, does this sound like a developing transmission issue or could it just be that I didn't quite shift "positively" or firmly enough?

Obviously if it's a transmission issue I want to take care of it quickly.

Thanks for any help you guys can offer!

- J

KSlawman
01-26-2007, 08:17 PM
With the low miles and such, I'd say that you just missed a shift. My bike was doing it new, until I started shifting more positively. Keep an eye on it, but it sounds like thats what happened.
Make mention of it with the dealer, make sure its documented.

ZukiFred
01-26-2007, 08:27 PM
I agree with KSlawman, might not have had it fully into gear and it just popped into the lower gear.

KatanaSoldier
01-26-2007, 09:06 PM
You missed the shift bro. It happens.

nightmare
01-27-2007, 10:48 AM
Thanks for the advice, guys. I was thinking it was probably just a simple input-error, but I wanted to be absolutely sure before I dismissed the problem.

Thanks again!

-J

The CyberPoet
01-27-2007, 02:33 PM
I do sell a kit that will eliminate that issue; it replaces the stock shift indent spring with a stiffer one that will require a bit more force before it disengages one gear (and delivers more force to the actual motion, improving the landing of the gear splines on the other end of the shift). $38.50 + shipping (& in your case, sales tax because you're also here in Florida).

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

Mojoe
01-28-2007, 10:25 PM
be firmer with your shifts. and while you are at it, try waiting a bit longer before shifting. taking it past 5k through first and second is actually a bit more healthy for your engine than NEVER doing it. That red line is where it is for 2 reason. it warns you not to pass it, but it also calls out for you to get a little closer once in a while. you are being too conservative. if your bike was a woman, you would lose her in a second for being too shy and not aggressive enough ;)

nightmare
01-29-2007, 11:33 AM
Good point mojoe! I have been holding back since this is my first bike and I'm still learning what's ok and what's not ok, and of course I appreciate all the advice...now I know, treat my bike like I treat my women :-D

Usually I take it right up to 5k rpm and then shift while I'm in the first two. After that I usually shift around 7-8k (during the high-speed morning commute).


Now I have a question: I ran a search on here concerning where to shift, and I read that during the first two gears the shifting should be done at about 5k

http://katriders.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=25313&highlight=shift
(Go about 1/5 of the way down to CP's first post in that topic).

So that's the advice I've been (sort of) following up until now (especially the 5k rpm minimum during riding...feels smoother there)

So here's what I'm thinking:

In general, follow CP's advice on where to shift, and periodically push it a little further.

Ok...I think I'm straight...Thanks again!

Mojoe
01-29-2007, 01:14 PM
The torque-peak for a typical car is around 3k-4k RPM, with the redline somewhere around 5 to 6k usually. The torque peak for a Katana is around 8800 RPM (with the "fat" band being from about 7200 RPM to 9850 RPM). If you want to feel what your bike was designed to do, try this:

Shift 1st-2nd around 4500
2nd-3rd around 5500
the rest around 8-10k RPM.

You'll probably discover a whole new world of motorcycle ownership if you've been shifting by 3300 RPM, which is still bogging-down RPM's on the Kat... Except leaving the line, I virtually never run the bike under 4500 RPM at any point, and even a pleasant-valley-sunday-drive would be 5k minimum...

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

I would say his post is good info as far as how low you should allow the rpms to be before shifting. as in the minimum. in my opinion, it is still conservative. shifting from 2nd to 3rd at 5500 would drop you down to what? 3500-4k when you hit 3rd? that's not too bad, but it will be a bit sluggish up to the powerband before the next shift.

For sure it can be a bit intimidating when you are a new rider. like I said before just wait a bit longer before shifting so as to get a feel of the bike when it hits it's peak torque. the engine will be screaming more, and you will feel the torque. You don't need to be going fast for this. also when you are cruising in 5th at say....oh....5k rpm, just drop it down a gear and crack it open for a short burst. You don't need to reach high speeds or act the fool. This is just to get you used to what resources you have yet to tap into.

The CyberPoet
01-29-2007, 01:57 PM
I would say his post is good info as far as how low you should allow the rpms to be before shifting. as in the minimum. in my opinion, it is still conservative. shifting from 2nd to 3rd at 5500 would drop you down to what? 3500-4k when you hit 3rd? that's not too bad, but it will be a bit sluggish up to the powerband before the next shift.

On a 98+, you lose right around 1050 RPM per shift at 6k, so if you go 2nd-3rd at 5500, you should be coming out momentarily at 4450. Not quite bogging territory, and if you're accelerating, you'll only be there momentarily. The 1st & 2nd gear shift points recommended in my original post actually came from some Suzuki literature which talked about the potential mechanical effects of backlash in the lowest two gears if you are at high RPM's and suddenly go closed-throttle -- thus it is actually their recommendation that you wait to 3rd to wind it out all the way.

Cheers,
=-= The CyberPoet

rwcreigh
01-29-2007, 03:00 PM
With the low miles and such, I'd say that you just missed a shift. My bike was doing it new, until I started shifting more positively. Keep an eye on it, but it sounds like thats what happened.
Make mention of it with the dealer, make sure its documented.

+1

nightmare
01-30-2007, 07:25 PM
Went riding yesterday and sort of combined everybody's suggestions (as much as possible) and things went nicely...I made sure to shift firmly, waiting for higher rpm's to shift at, etc. Things are movingly along swimingly :)

I greatly appreciate the advice and information from everybody!